MEASURE 74


ARGUMENT IN OPPOSITION

    My father was murdered during a jewelry store robbery.

    As a victim of crime, I am keenly aware of the short-comings in our criminal justice system.

    I am appalled, however, by the measures we are being asked to approve in the name of crime victims' rights, Measures 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74 and 75. These measures are a fraud perpetrated upon us as protecting crime victims, but which do nothing but provide empty promises.

    They have, instead, everything to do with giving the government the same kind of unbridled powers that allowed Special Prosecutor Kenneth Starr to run amok in Washington, D.C.

    Like most Oregonians, I am in favor of protecting crime victims, and if these measures did so I would urge your support. But crime victims like me and my family are being used in a cynical ploy to gain your vote. Don't let them use our pain to their advantage.

    Please Vote No on Measures 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74 and 75.

    Michele Kohler

(This information furnished by Michele Kohler.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.


ARGUMENT IN OPPOSITION

Benton County Sheriff Stan Robson urges you to vote No
on Measures 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74 and 75.

    As Benton County Sheriff, I know most of these measures can be accomplished without repealing the Oregon Bill of Rights. It is not appropriate to abuse the constitution with issues already covered by current law.

    Measure 69 states no defendant can ever be considered a victim. Even in cases of domestic violence a woman charged for defending herself against an abusive husband could never be considered a victim. It's wrong to place that language in our Bill of Rights.

    Measure 70 could cost local counties millions of dollars, while eliminating the right to choose how to be tried, a basic tenet of Oregon's Bill of Rights.

    Measure 71 would require our county, and many others with overcrowded jails, to release criminals to make room for those awaiting trial. As sheriff, I want to protect my community from the most dangerous offenders, not release them early because of Measure 71.

    Measure 72. Oregon should take every precaution against convicting innocent people of murder. Unanimous verdicts are the best means of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. Innocent people could be convicted if Measure 72 passes.

    Measure 73. Our Bill of Rights says a person cannot be forced to testify against himself. As Sheriff, I know we either have a confession or we don't. This basic right must not be repealed.

    Measure 74: In our current system, law enforcement works with prosecutors and judges to determine appropriate sentences, including work release, home detention and community service. This measure will increase overcrowding in our jails. And it will strip us of valuable alternative sanctions that often fit the crime better than jail time.

    Measure 75 could cost taxpayers millions. Our current jury system is fair and balanced. We should leave our Bill of Rights alone.

    Please join me in Voting No on Measures 69-75.

    Sheriff Stan Robson

(This information furnished by Stan Robson, Benton County Sheriff.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.


Arguments In Favor

Measure 74 Text

November 2, 1999 Special Election Voters' Pamphlet Table of Contents