MEASURE 75


ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

VOTE YES ON MEASURE 75 TO KEEP CRIMINALS OFF

CRIMINAL JURIES

It is hard to believe, but criminals can serve on criminal juries in Oregon. There is a statute which prevents felons (higher level criminals) from serving on juries, but this is not in the Constitution, and there is no provision which prevents violent or dishonest misdemeanants (lower level criminals) from serving on juries. This is particularly disturbing in regard to grand juries, where the prosecutor has no opportunity to object to the persons who sit on the grand jury. Imagine this: criminals sitting on a grand jury, deciding whether a criminal defendant should be indicted or not. This measure needs to be made a part of the Constitution; otherwise, the Legislature can change the statute at any time.

This measure is a referral from the Legislature. It closely reflects part of what was originally passed by the voters by a wide margin within Measure 40 in November 1996. The Oregon Supreme Court later ruled that Ballot Measure 40 could not be enacted as a single amendment to the Oregon Constitution, because it had several provisions which should be voted on separately. So, the Legislature has split the original Measure 40 into separate amendments. This measure reflects one of those amendments.

Referral of this measure to the voters was sought by the three largest, longest established victims' organizations in Oregon (Parents of Murdered Children; Mothers Against Drunk Driving; Crime Victims United) and by Oregon law enforcement organizations (Association Chiefs of Police; District Attorneys Association; State Sheriffs Association; State Police; Federation of Parole and Probation Officers).

This measure guarantees that convicted felons, and convicted misdemeanants in crimes involving dishonesty or violence, are prevented from serving on criminal juries. Please vote yes on Measure 75.

Kevin L. Mannix
State Representative

(This information furnished by Kevin L. Mannix, Justice For All.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.


ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

In 1996, Oregonians overwhelmingly voted to give crime victims at least as many rights as criminals. But the politicians on the Oregon Supreme Court came up with a never-before used technicality to throw out the voters' wishes.

Measures 69 through 75 are virtually the same Crime Victims Bill of Rights.

If you were a crime victim, would you want a jury of fair-minded citizens? Or instead, would you like to have a jury full of felons, sex offenders, and thieves?

The Oregon Constitution currently allows convicted felons and person convicted of crimes like shoplifting, forgery, or assault to serve on juries.

In one recent example, a grand juror with a criminal history refused to vote in favor of any indictment involving a violent felony, because her boyfriend had been imprisoned for conviction of a violent felony. Her response was that this was her way of "getting back" at the system. Another example occurred when a convicted felon refused to disclose his criminal history, was placed on a jury, and tied proceedings up so long that the jury hung, and the criminal went free.

Regardless of your perspective, juries have an important job: listening to both sides, and deciding what is fair and just. This is too important to leave up to convicted felons, petty thieves, and other violent offenders.

LET'S KEEP CONVICTED CRIMINALS FROM SERVING ON OREGON JURIES!

PLEASE VOTE YES ON MEASURES 69 THROUGH 75!

SHOULDN'T THE CRIME VICTIM HAVE AT LEAST AS MANY RIGHTS AS THE CRIMINAL?

(This information furnished by Steve Doell, Crime Victims United.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.


ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

Measures 69 thru 75 are part of Ballot Measure 40 "The Victims Bill of Rights" passed by the people with nearly a 60% yes vote in 1996. This measure was part of that "Bill of Rights."

Oregon's Supreme Court overturned Measure 40 in its entirety using newly interpreted technical grounds. Consequently, the legislators divided Ballot Measure 40 into seven separate parts, which included most of Measure 40 and referred these seven measures to the people to be voted on again.

Some try to make people believe that a jury decision only affects the person being tried. If you or your family become a victim of a criminal, the finding of the jury in your case may likely be one of the most important decisions affecting you for the rest of your life. Was the jury fair, just, impartial, thorough and honest in their consideration of the evidence? Did they follow the law?

These characteristics are not usually associated with people who have been convicted of felony crimes and have served time in jail or prison. Some criminals are clever, manipulative people with powerful personalities. They revel in making a mockery of our criminal justice system. Such people should never be on a jury because the damage they can do to society in general and the victims in particular is enormous.

Where our constitution speaks of our right to be tried by a jury of our peers, it does not mean a criminal gets to be tried by a jury of criminals.

This measure ultimately offers respectability to those who have committed a felony. They can demonstrate their worthiness for jury duty by leading a crime free life for 15 years after conviction and release from prison or jail.

We don't need criminals making life-altering decisions that can profoundly affect innocent lives.

Please Vote YES on Measure 75.

Please Vote YES to prohibit criminals on juries.

Bob & Dee Dee Kouns
Founders of Crime Victims United
Chief Petitioners of Ballot Measure 40
(This information furnished by Bob & Dee Dee Kouns, Crime Victims United.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.


ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

It is time to balance the scales of justice.
One of the ways to achieve this is to vote yes on Ballot Measure 75. The scales of justice have always leaned toward the perpetrators of crime. It is time that the innocent victims of crime have equitable rights. The jurors mission is to be finder of fact and to be able to base their decision based on the evidence presented to them. They should not rely on preconceived biases that would affect that decision. Most criminals feel that somehow they are the victim. That a wrong was committed against them. How can a person in this situation be fair and objective. My father was murdered on June 25, 1996. Paul Rivenes was a father, grandfather, husband, brother, uncle, friend and community leader. He was the innocent victim of violent crime. He owned a grocery store and 3 men decided that they wanted money. He was stabbed 16 times. If his murderers guilt or innocence had been decided by convicted criminals, there is a possibility that they would be out on the street today generating more and more victims. Butchering more innocent people.

Guilt or innocence should not be decided by criminals but by responsible law abiding citizens.

Please vote yes on Measure 75.

Julie Hedden
Daughter of Murder Victim Paul Rivenes

(This information furnished by Julie Hedden, Crime Victims United.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.


Arguments In Opposition

Measure 75 Text

November 2, 1999 Special Election Voters' Pamphlet Table of Contents