Measure No. 66

Explanatory Statement

Arguments in Favor

Arguments in Opposition

Measure Contents Page

Proposed by initiative petition to be voted on at the General Election, November 3, 1998.

BALLOT TITLE

66

AMENDS CONSTITUTION: DEDICATES SOME LOTTERY FUNDING TO PARKS, BEACHES; HABITAT, WATERSHED PROTECTION

RESULT OF "YES" VOTE: "Yes" vote dedicates 15 percent lottery funding to parks, beaches; salmon, wildlife habitat, watershed protection.
RESULT OF "NO" VOTE: "No" vote retains system restricting state lottery funding to job creation, economic development, public education.
SUMMARY:Amends constitution. State lottery proceeds currently limited to job creation, economic development, public education. Measure dedicates 15 percent of net lottery proceeds to new fund for parks, beaches; salmon, wildlife habitat, watershed protection. Dedicates half of fund to create, maintain state parks, ocean shores, public beach access areas, historic sites, recreation areas. Dedicates other half for single agency to administer funds to protect native salmon, wildlife habitat, watersheds, using at least 65 percent for capital expenditures. Requires biennial audits, voter renewal in 2014. Other provisions.
ESTIMATE OF FINANCIAL IMPACT: An estimated $46.2 million of state lottery proceeds will be directed each year to parks and natural resources until the year 2014, when there is an automatic revote. Currently the Oregon legislature allocates those funds to a variety of programs including, but not limited to, education, economic and community development, natural resources and transportation. This estimate is based on 1999-2001 projections of lottery proceeds.

TEXT OF MEASURE

Be It Enacted by the People of the State of Oregon:

PARAGRAPH 1. Section 4, Article XV of the Constitution of the State of Oregon, is amended, and the Constitution of the State of Oregon is amended by creating new sections 4a and 4b to be added to and made a part of Article XV, such sections to read:

Sec. 4. (1) Except as provided in subsections (2), (3), (4), [and] (5) and (6) of this section, lotteries and the sale of lottery tickets, for any purpose whatever, are prohibited, and the Legislative Assembly shall prevent the same by penal laws.

(2) The Legislative Assembly may provide for the establishment, operation, and regulation of raffles and the lottery commonly known as bingo or lotto by charitable, fraternal, or religious organizations. As used in this section, charitable, fraternal or religious organization means such organizations or foundations as defined by law because of their charitable, fraternal, or religious purposes. The regulations shall define eligible organizations or foundations, and may prescribe the frequency of raffles, bingo or lotto, set a maximum monetary limit for prizes and require a statement of the odds on winning a prize. The Legislative Assembly shall vest the regulatory authority in any appropriate state agency.

(3) There is hereby created the State Lottery Commission which shall establish and operate a State Lottery. All proceeds from the State Lottery, including interest, but excluding costs of administration and payment of prizes, shall be used for any of the following purposes: creating jobs, furthering economic development, [or] financing public education in Oregon or restoring and protecting Oregon's parks, beaches, watersheds and critical fish and wildlife habitats.

(4)(a) The State Lottery Commission shall be comprised of five members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate who shall serve at the pleasure of the Governor. At least one of the Commissioners shall have a minimum of five years experience in law enforcement and at least one of the Commissioners shall be a certified public accountant. The Commission is empowered to promulgate rules related to the procedures of the Commission and the operation of the State Lottery. Such rules and any statutes enacted to further implement this article shall insure the integrity, security, honesty, and fairness of the Lottery. The Commission shall have such additional powers and duties as may be provided by law.

(b) The Governor shall appoint a Director subject to confirmation by the Senate who shall serve at the pleasure of the Governor. The Director shall be qualified by training and experience to direct the operations of a state-operated lottery. The Director shall be responsible for managing the affairs of the Commission. The Director may appoint and prescribe the duties of no more than four Assistant Directors as the Director deems necessary. One of the Assistant Directors shall be responsible for a security division to assure security, integrity, honesty, and fairness in the operations and administration of the State Lottery. To fulfill these responsibilities, the Assistant Director for security shall be qualified by training and experience, including at least five years of law enforcement experience, and knowledge and experience in computer security.

(c) The Director shall implement and operate a State Lottery pursuant to the rules, and under the guidance, of the Commission. The State Lottery may operate any game procedure authorized by the commission, except parimutuel racing, social games, and the games commonly known in Oregon as bingo or lotto, whereby prizes are distributed using any existing or future methods among adult persons who have paid for tickets or shares in that game; provided that, in lottery games utilizing computer terminals or other devices, no coins or currency shall ever be dispensed directly to players from such computer terminals or devices.

(d) There is hereby created within the General Fund the Oregon State Lottery Fund which is continuously appropriated for the purpose of administering and operating the Commission and the State Lottery. The State Lottery shall operate as a self-supporting revenue-raising agency of state government and no appropriations, loans, or other transfers of state funds shall be made to it. The State Lottery shall pay all prizes and all of its expenses out of the revenues it receives from the sale of tickets or shares to the public and turnover the net proceeds therefrom to a fund to be established by the Legislative Assembly from which the Legislative Assembly shall make appropriations for the benefit of any of the following public purposes: creating jobs, furthering economic development, [or] financing public education in Oregon or restoring and protecting Oregon's parks, beaches, watersheds and critical fish and wildlife habitats. Effective July 1, 1997, 15% of the net proceeds from the State Lottery shall be deposited, from the fund created by the Legislative Assembly under this paragraph, in an education endowment fund. Earnings on moneys in the education endowment fund shall be retained in the fund or expended for the public purpose of financing public education in Oregon as provided by law. Moneys in the education endowment fund shall be invested as provided by law and shall not be subject to the limitations of section 6, Article XI of this Constitution. The Legislative Assembly may appropriate other moneys or revenue to the education endowment fund. The Legislative Assembly shall appropriate amounts sufficient to pay lottery bonds before appropriating the net proceeds from the State Lottery for any other purpose. At least 84% of the total annual revenues from the sale of all lottery tickets or shares shall be returned to the public in the form of prizes and net revenues benefiting the public purpose.

(5) Effective July 1, 1999, 15% of the net proceeds from the State Lottery shall be deposited in a parks and natural resources fund created by the Legislative Assembly. Of the moneys in the parks and natural resources fund, 50% shall be distributed for the public purpose of financing the protection, repair, operation, and creation of state parks, ocean shore and public beach access areas, historic sites and recreation areas, and 50% shall be distributed for the public purpose of financing the restoration and protection of native salmonid populations, watersheds, fish and wildlife habitats and water quality in Oregon. The Legislative Assembly shall not limit expenditures from the parks and natural resources fund. The Legislative Assembly may appropriate other moneys or revenue to the parks and natural resources fund.

[(5)] (6) Only one State Lottery operation shall be permitted in the State.

[(6)] (7) The Legislative Assembly has no power to authorize, and shall prohibit, casinos from operation in the State of Oregon.

SECTION 4a. Any state agency that receives moneys from the parks and natural resources fund established under section 4 of this Article for the public purpose of financing the protection, repair, operation, creation and development of state parks, ocean shores and public beach access areas, historic sites and recreation areas shall have the authority to use the moneys for the following purposes:

(1) Maintain, construct, improve, develop, manage and operate state park and recreation facilities, programs and areas.

(2) Acquire real property, or interest therein, deemed necessary for the creation and operation of state parks, ocean shores public beach access areas, recreation and historic sites or because of natural, scenic, cultural, historic and recreational values.

(3) Operate grant programs for local government entities deemed necessary to accomplish the public purposes of the parks and natural resources fund established under section 4 of this Article.

SECTION 4b. Moneys disbursed for the public purpose of financing the restoration and protection of wild salmonid populations, watersheds, fish and wildlife habitats and water quality from the fund established under Section 4 of this Article shall be administered by one state agency. At least 65% of the moneys will be used for capital expenditures. These moneys, including grants, shall be used for all of the following purposes:

(1) Watershed, fish and wildlife, and riparian and other native species, habitat conservation activities, including but not limited to planning, coordination, assessment, implementation, restoration, inventory, information management and monitoring activities.

(2) Watershed and riparian education efforts.

(3) The development and implementation of watershed and water quality enhancement plans.

(4) Entering into agreements to obtain from willing owners determinate interests in lands and waters that protect watershed resources, including but not limited to fee simple interests in land, leases of land or conservation easements.

(6) Enforcement of fish and wildlife and habitat protection laws and regulations.

SECTION 4c. Any state agency that receives moneys from the parks and natural resources fund established under section 4 of this Article shall secure an independent audit, pursuant to section 2, Article VI of this Constitution, to measure the financial integrity, effectiveness and performance of the agency receiving such moneys. Each agency shall submit the audit to the Legislative Assembly as part of a biennial report to the Legislative Assembly.

SECTION 5a. The Legislative Assembly shall submit to a vote of the people at the November 2014 general elections the question of continuation of this amendment. This Section is repealed on January 1, 2015.

NOTE: Boldfaced type indicates new language; [brackets and italic] type indicates deletions or comments.

EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

Ballot Measure 66 amends the Oregon Constitution to allow money from the State Lottery to be used for restoring and protecting Oregon's parks, beaches, watersheds and critical fish and wildlife habitat.

Currently, lottery money may be used only for creating jobs, furthering economic development and financing public education in Oregon.

This measure requires that 15 percent of net proceeds from the State Lottery be deposited in a newly-created parks and natural resources fund. The money in the fund will be divided equally with half of the money spent for creating, protecting and operating state parks, ocean shore and other natural recreation areas and half of the money spent for restoring and protecting native salmon runs, watersheds, water quality and fish and wildlife habitat.

The money for state parks and other natural recreation areas may be allocated and spent by a variety of state and local agencies. However, the measure requires that the money for restoring and protecting native salmon runs, watersheds, water quality and fish and wildlife habitat must be administered by a single state agency. That state agency must spend at least 65 percent of the money available to the agency for capital expenditures.

The state agencies that administer or receive money from the parks and natural resources fund are directed by this measure to spend the money for specified activities, including but not limited to creating and improving state parks, providing grants to local government for parks and natural resource programs, assessing, managing and monitoring habitat conservation activities, implementing watershed and water quality improvement plans, obtaining interest in private property from willing owners to protect watersheds, and for enforcing fish and wildlife and habitat protection laws.

The Legislative Assembly may not limit expenditures from the parks and natural resources fund, under this measure.

Periodic audits of the effectiveness and performance of agencies receiving money from the parks and natural resources fund are required.

The measure requires the legislature to submit to a vote of the people at the November 2014 general election the question of keeping the provisions of this measure in the Oregon Constitution.
Committee Members:Appointed by:
Pat Amedeo**Secretary of State
Patricia McCaig**Secretary of State
Harold Haugen*Secretary of State
Mike McArthur*Secretary of State
Jim RossMembers of the Committee

*Member dissents (does not concur with explanatory statement)

**Proponents of measure appointed by Secretary of State because chief petitioners did not make appointments by deadline.

(This committee was appointed to provide an impartial explanation of the ballot measure pursuant to ORS 251.215.)

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

For many years, we Oregonians have been creating parks and open spaces - protecting places that inspire and enrich our lives. Parks, wild and scenic rivers, trails and greenways have fostered a set of values that we treasure as Oregonians: appreciation of the outdoors, caring for our natural and cultural heritage, providing opportunities for personal challenge and adventure, conserving our environment, and bringing together families and communities to foster mutual understanding and respect.

These values, these benefits, are not trivial additions to the course of our lives. If the gates of every park, beach and boat launch were closed, if families were unable to use a favorite picnic grove or campground, we would as a state feel an overwhelming sense that an essential part of our lives was being lost.

Recreation and parks are essential to quality of life. Parks are significant economic generators - they attract businesses to the state as prime economic development and relocation magnets. And, of course, parks are major attractions that draw tourism, one of Oregon's top industries. Parks, open space and natural areas are essential to ecological survival. Outdoor recreation is one of the best approaches to environmental education -a key to long term sustainability.

As Oregon's economy has boomed, support for our natural heritage has stagnated since 1980 when gasoline tax revenues were discontinued for state parks funding. Now, our parks system is in distress. Critical repairs and vital operations have been delayed or discontinued for many parks.

Measure 66 does not create a new tax, but shares our existing lottery resources to fund the repair and restoration of our parks and to prevent closures. Measure 66 will also help restore threatened fish runs, protect wildlife habitat and improve water quality in our rivers and streams--all things that make Oregon one of the last great places.

Vote YES on Measure 66 to protect our parks and wildlife!

(This information furnished by Frank Jagodnik, Executive Director, Oregon Recreation & Park Association.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

It is time for us to protect Oregon's legacy.

Oregon has a great history of bold action to save our natural heritage. From Oswald West claiming our beaches as a treasure belonging to all Oregonians in 1914, to Tom McCall and other leaders passing the bottle bill, land use planning and cleaning up the Willamette River in the 60's and 70's, Oregonians have risen to the challenge.

Today, we need to rise to perhaps the greatest challenge of all.

Our state parks, our fish and wildlife and the watersheds and waterways we all depend on are in trouble. A combination of the pressures of growth and a lack of adequate investment, has brought us near a point of no return. We haven't opened a new park or campground in 28 years, and 65 of the ones we have are threatened with closure. Fish and wildlife are becoming threatened and endangered at an alarming rate, while 30,000 miles of Oregon streams and rivers, including the Willamette, are polluted or degraded.

These are some of the reasons we have joined the Campaign for Parks and Salmon, and are urging our fellow Oregonians to vote Yes on Ballot Measure 66. We believe the measure's dedication of 15% of the lottery is fair, accountable and will make a tremendous difference. And it will not increase taxes of any kind.

But beyond the specific problems, and the details of the solution Measure 66 provides are far more basic questions:

Earlier we said that it is time to protect Oregon's legacy. In fact, it is past time. Please join us in voting Yes on Ballot Measure 66.
Senator Mark Hatfield Governor Neil Goldschmidt

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

MESSAGE TO VOTERS

As the Chief Petitioners of Measure 66 we are proud to have worked together with over 144,000 Oregonians who signed our initiative to put this measure on the November ballot. Like so many of you, we are committed to preserving Oregon's unique qualities. This measure provides an excellent and rare opportunity to do so. Measure 66 provides a dedicated source of funding for the repair, maintenance and operation of our state parks, and the protection of our water quality, fish and wildlife habitat. This measure does not call for any new taxes; it does require an independent audit every two years, and in 15 years the measure will be returned to you, the voters, to decide if it should continue.

The measure sets aside 15% of lottery proceeds to:

Measure 66 provides an opportunity to leave a legacy to our children and grandchildren: and Oregon with clean, safe and open parks; public beaches with convenient access; clean air and water; and healthy and abundant fish and wildlife. We hope that you will join us in supporting Measure 66.

Brian Booth State Parks Commission, Former Chair

L.L. "Stub" Stewart Parks Commissioner

Geoff Pampush Oregon Trout, Director

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

What does the Parks and Salmon measure do?

If passed, the measure will:

Where does the money to do this come from?

The Oregon Lottery. The Parks and Salmon measure dedicates 15% of lottery proceeds, approximately 1% of the state budget, to the purposes outlined above.

How much will the measure raise?

Using current estimates, the measure will raise between $35 - $45 million a year.

How will the money be distributed?

What accountability is there for how the money is spent?

The measure requires an independent audit every two years. Additionally, voter approval will be required again in 15 years.

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

TEN GOOD REASONS TO SUPPORT MEASURE 66:

1. Public ocean beaches and beach access.

2. Improved park facilities.

3. New parks to preserve scenic places and provide recreation.

4. Hiking, biking and horseback trails.

5. Access for fishing, boating, canoeing and windsurfing.

6. Historic sites and lighthouses.

7. Protected fish and wildlife habitat.

8. Camping sites and picnic areas.

9. Wildlife viewing areas.

10. Clean streams.

HELP SAVE THE BEST OF OREGON FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS

PLEASE VOTE YES ON MEASURE 66

Brian Booth Gwyneth Gamble Booth

Portland

(This information furnished by Brian Booth, Gwyneth Gamble Booth.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

During my time as Oregon's State Park Director, from 1964 to 1992, the Oregon Legislature acted to eliminate dedicated state support for Oregon's parks. As a result of a 1980 ballot referral, state parks stopped receiving money from the gas tax and state funding virtually disappeared.

Although the Legislature promised general fund replacement dollars, the money was never allocated and today state parks receive just one tenth of one percent of the state budget. As a result of this lack of funding Oregon's parks are suffering.

The following illustrate a few examples of how parks are being effected:

In Central Oregon, where I live, many state parks are in need of additional resources for basic maintenance and repairs.

With up to 65 state parks on the brink of closure and over 41 million visitors each year, it's time to make the investment necessary to preserve Oregon's Parks.

Dave Talbot
Former Oregon State Parks Director
Chair, State Parks Trust

(This information furnished by David G. Talbot, Oregon State Parks Trust.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

MEASURE 66 PROTECTS OUR WATER QUALITY

Oregon is the last great place in the lower 48 states where salmon are still caught downtown in our largest city. It's a place where anyone can experience the quiet solitude of a free flowing river within a 30 minute drive. It's a place where salmon are as much a part of our history and culture as our forests or Mt. Hood.

But for those statements to remain true, we must act now. And the best thing we can do is to pass Measure 66.

Measure 66: Preserving our Rivers, Streams and Watersheds

Oregon has approximately 100,000 miles of river. Right now, nearly 30,000 miles are polluted. The good news is that we know how to solve the problem. Small, strategic investment -- one watershed at a time -- can reverse this trend. There is no question that we can clean up our water.

The only question is, are we willing to do it? Passing Measure 66 will provide the desperately needed funds to make it happen.

Measure 66: Protecting Our Fish

Our native salmon, trout and steelhead are in trouble through their entire range in Oregon. That is not only an ecological crisis, it is an economic one as well. Oregon's commercial and sportfishing industry forms the livelihood of thousands of Oregonians. Beyond that, the survival of our native fish is much like the "canary in the coal mine" the extinction of a salmon run is an indicator of things to come.

Once again, there are many things we can do to stop the destruction of the fish and wildlife that are so much a part of Oregon's identify. But Measure 66 is the only thing on the horizon that offers a way to accomplish it.

PROTECT OUR WATER. SAVE OUR FISH. VOTE YES ON 66!

(This information furnished by Jason O. McKain, Oregon Trout.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

POTENTIAL PROJECTS

OREGON COAST

Measure 66 provides a source of funding ­ 15% of the lottery -- for the repair, maintenance and operation of our parks; and the protection of our water quality, fish and wildlife habitat. Local parks and communities are eligible to apply for grants. Following is a partial list of projects eligible for funding if Measure 66 passes.

For additional projects in your area please contact the Campaign for Parks & Salmon at 503-279-8343.

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

POTENTIAL PROJECTS

MULTNOMAH COUNTY

Measure 66 provides a source of funding ­ 15% of the lottery -- for the repair, maintenance and operation of our parks; and the protection of our water quality, fish and wildlife habitat. Local parks and communities are eligible to apply for grants. Following is a partial list of projects eligible for funding if Measure 66 passes.

For additional projects in your area please contact the Campaign for Parks & Salmon at 503-279-8343.

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

POTENTIAL PROJECTS

WASHINGTON COUNTY

Measure 66 provides a source of funding ­ 15% of the lottery -- for the repair, maintenance and operation of our parks; and the protection of our water quality, fish and wildlife habitat. Local parks and communities are eligible to apply for grants. Following is a partial list of projects eligible for funding if Measure 66 passes.

For additional projects in your area please contact the Campaign for Parks & Salmon at 503-279-8343.

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

POTENTIAL PROJECTS

CLACKAMAS COUNTY

Measure 66 provides a source of funding ­ 15% of the lottery -- for the repair, maintenance and operation of our parks; and the protection of our water quality, fish and wildlife habitat. Local parks and communities are eligible to apply for grants. Following is a partial list of projects eligible for funding if Measure 66 passes.

For additional projects in your area please contact the Campaign for Parks & Salmon at 503-279-8343.

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

POTENTIAL PROJECTS

MARION COUNTY

Measure 66 provides a source of funding ­ 15% of the lottery -- for the repair, maintenance and operation of our parks; and the protection of our water quality, fish and wildlife habitat. Local parks and communities are eligible to apply for grants. Following is a partial list of projects eligible for funding if Measure 66 passes.

For additional projects in your area please contact the Campaign for Parks & Salmon at 503-279-8343.

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

POTENTIAL PROJECTS

LANE COUNTY

Measure 66 provides a source of funding ­ 15% of the lottery -- for the repair, maintenance and operation of our parks; and the protection of our water quality, fish and wildlife habitat. Local parks and communities are eligible to apply for grants. Following is a partial list of projects eligible for funding if Measure 66 passes.

For additional projects in your area please contact the Campaign for Parks & Salmon at 503-279-8343.

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

POTENTIAL PROJECTS

JACKSON COUNTY

Measure 66 provides a source of funding ­ 15% of the lottery -- for the repair, maintenance and operation of our parks; and the protection of our water quality, fish and wildlife habitat. Local parks and communities are eligible to apply for grants. Following is a partial list of projects eligible for funding if Measure 66 passes.

For additional projects in your area please contact the Campaign for Parks & Salmon at 503-279-8343.

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

A message from The Nature Conservancy:

VOTE YES ON MEASURE 66 PROTECT OREGON'S LAST GREAT PLACES

MEASURE 66 IS THE ANSWER . . .

. . . to many of Oregon's most urgent habitat protection needs:

MEASURE 66 IS A POSITIVE SOLUTION. . .

. . . because it is non-regulatory, voluntary, cooperative, provides full accounting for funds, and imposes no new taxes.

PROTECTING OREGON'S NATURAL HERITAGE . . .

. . . is something we owe to future generations. With Measure 66, we all benefit, because preserving biological diversity:

­ keeps ecosystems healthy, including our air and drinking water

­ improves farm and forest products

­ provides new and useful products, including many medicines

­ enriches our lives through connection with nature.

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY . . .

. . . is a non-profit membership organization that safeguards the natural diversity of native plants, animals and ecosystems. In cooperation with partners and communities, we buy and manage natural areas and restore habitats to prevent extinctions and to preserve Oregon's outstanding natural diversity. Please join us in support of Measure 66!

­ Russell Hoeflich, Vice President and Oregon Director

­ Robert L. Ridgley, Chair, Board of Trustees

(This information furnished by Stephen Anderson, The Nature Conservancy of Oregon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

If You Love the Great Outdoors Measure 66 is for You!

A big part of what makes Oregon great can only be seen outside of four walls. As Oregon sportsmen and sportswomen, we believe that is the best reason to vote for Measure 66.

There are so many great experiences to share in Oregon's great outdoors:

Because these things are so much a part of what we understand to be Oregon, we tend to assume they will always be there. But unless we act today, we could lose them sooner than you could imagine.

If you enjoy--or hope to enjoy--any of those activities, Measure 66 may be the most important vote you cast this year.

You cannot open a newspaper without reading about a park that is threatened with closure, a species of fish or wildlife that is in trouble, or a river that is becoming polluted. As people who spend an important part of our lives outdoors, we can testify that it is all true. Measure 66 is the best chance in decades to protect the Oregon we all love--and that we want to pass on.

Please join us in saving what's best about Oregon. Vote Yes on the Parks and Salmon Measure.

The Oregon Sportsmen's Political Victory Fund

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

With all of the noise and confusion of competing ballot measures and campaign rhetoric, it's easy to lose sight of what some of these issues are really all about.

Measure 66 is about saving parks and salmon and natural areas to support Oregon's native wildlife. But more than that, it's about saving some of the things that make Oregon special.

The Western Meadowlark, our state bird, was once a common sight in the fields of western Oregon. Salmon and steelhead were abundant and fishing was a way of life for many Oregonians. Our state parks were a point of pride, and we felt sorry for residents of other states that had shown less foresight in protecting part of their natural heritage.

Over the past few decades, Oregon has lost much that we once took for granted. Some of the changes, like the loss of the meadowlark in the Willamette Valley, occurred so gradually that most of us never noticed. Other changes, like the explosion of suburbs into former farmlands, seemed to happen overnight.

Measure 66 will help protect key pieces of our natural heritage that are rapidly slipping away.

We have in place many of the elements needed for a concerted effort to restore Oregon's salmon and watersheds, rebuild our parks and protect habitat for native wildlife. Private land owners, government agencies and industry and conservation groups are working together to begin to reverse the decline of our natural ecosystems.

But good intentions won't be enough. We need to back them up with real money and a commitment to long-term investment in habitat for fish and wildlife, parks and healthy watersheds.

Measure 66 asks us to choose: do we care enough about Oregon to act now -- before it's too late?

Please join us in voting YES on 66.

SARA VICKERMAN

Defenders of Wildlife 1637 Laurel Street Lake Oswego, OR 97034 503/697-3222

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

INVESTING IN THE OREGON COAST & CREATING A LEGACY...

THE COAST & DEVELOPMENT...

The future of the Oregon Coast will depend on the immediate preservation of additional coastal land before it disappears through increasing development. What we value about the coastal experience may be lost forever if we don't do something now! Let's keep the coast for everyone!

We need to fund parks now to preserve a legacy for future generations.

BEACHES & TRAILS...

The Oregon Coast Trail gives the public access to explore and enjoy the entire coast. It stretches across our beaches and through many of our coastal parks. Thank you Oswald West and Tom McCall for giving us the beaches of Oregon!

Now it's your turn to create another legacy by funding parks and salmon.

ECONOMIC & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT...

Parks provide value-added attractions for tourism and their presence generated $560 million to Oregon's local economies in 1996 alone! Acquiring new park land and developing new facilities for recreation means investing in sustainable economic development, job creation, and enhancing the quality of life for everyone.

Measure 66 gives you the opportunity to invest in Oregon by funding parks and salmon.

PUBLIC EDUCATION & THE OUTDOORS...

Education takes place both inside and outside of the classroom. Education not only includes reading books, using computers, and studying at desks. It also means walking barefoot along a sandy beach, watching seagulls dive, and visiting a historic lighthouse. It's one thing to read about salmon swimming upstream -- its another to actually see them leap out of the water! The educational value of such experiences is immeasurable.

We need to fund parks and salmon!

THE FUTURE & MEASURE 66...

Let's keep and restore enough of Oregon's natural beauty as a legacy for future generations. Measure 66 is the best route we've got right now to ensure a future for parks and salmon.

Vote to fund Parks and Salmon!

Submitted by the National Coast Trail Association

(This information furnished by Al LePage, Executive Director, National Coast Trail Association (NCTA).)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

ORGANIZATIONS ACROSS OREGON SUPPORT MEASURE 66

In the last 20 years Oregon's population has grown 22%. And in the next 15 years, it is expected that another 500,000 people will be added to the Portland metro area alone. As Oregon experiences the stresses of growth ­ more people, more subdivisions, more highways, more cars and traffic, we are losing opportunities to preserve Oregon's quality of life: clean water; access to ocean beaches; parks that are safe, clean and open; rivers filled with salmon and abundant with fish and wildlife.

Measure 66 is our opportunity to invest in Oregon, preserving our natural heritage for the next generation.

Join us in supporting Measure 66 for Oregon's parks and salmon.

1000 Friends of Oregon

Association of Northwest Steelheaders

Audubon Society of Portland

Defenders of Wildlife

Friends of Kellogg Creek

Friends of the Columbia Gorge

Friends of Tryon Creek State Park Staff

National Coast Trail Association

The Nature Conservancy

Oregon Building Industry Association

Oregon Chapter, American Fisheries Society

Oregon Environmental Council

Oregon Forests Industry Council

Oregon League of Conservation Voters

Oregon Natural Desert Association

Oregon Natural Resources Council Action

Oregon Recreation and Park Association

Oregon Sportsman Political Victory Fund

Oregon Trout

Oregon Wetlands Joint Venture

Pacific Rivers Council

Sierra Club of Oregon

Trust for Public Land

Tualatin Riverkeepers

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

Teach Your Children Well. Protect our Parks. By Jim Schuld

What does it mean to educate our children?

As a father, grandfather and former teacher, I have an opinion about that, and it is why I urge you to vote Yes on Measure 66.

When you get to the heart of it, education is about preparing our kids to be successful adults.

Obviously, strong schools are vital. But education means much more than what happens inside a classroom. Young people are molded by every moment of their experience, whether in a classroom, at the family dinner table, or out among Oregon's forests, streams and beaches.

The loss of any of these educational opportunities hurts our children and our future. That is why I believe it is so important of Oregon voters to approve Ballot Measure 66 - the Campaign for Oregon's Parks and Salmon.

The ability to directly experience the natural world is indispensable in teaching our children to protect it. Our system of sate parks, public beaches and the vitality of our fish and wildlife are irreplaceable features of how we encounter the natural world - and they are under tremendous pressure. The good news is that a relatively modest investment -- 15% of lottery revenues -- can turn this situation around. That is what Measure 66 is all about.

What we get for that money is priceless. And no one has more of a stake in this measure than kids in school today and tomorrow. Dedicating these funds will help save an invaluable part of their education.

So if you care about how we educate our children, help pass Ballot Measure 66. There are things we must teach them that you can't learn from a book.

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR

Stop Poaching and Enforce the Law

One of the critical parts of preserving fish, wildlife and water quality is to enforce the laws that protect them. Right now, that enforcement is in crisis.

There has never been a time in the history of Oregon when fish and wildlife law enforcement has been more important. The Fish and Wildlife Division of the Oregon State Police is the single entity designated by law to protect these resources, and they have a big job, enforcing laws for:

But while Oregon's population has increased, and the need to closely monitor and enforce the law has become critical, and there have been devastating funding cuts to the Fish and Wildlife Officers responsible.

In fact, in the last year alone there have been 14 officer vacancies that haven't been filled for lack of money.

We have reached a point where it is impossible to adequately enforce the law--with a terrible impact. No matter what kind of programs we pursue to enhance our fish and wildlife, it will be lost if we cannot protect them.

Measure 66 will provide desperately needed funding to restore our ability to enforce the law and stop poachers, polluters and other who destroy or steal our precious natural resources. Without the passage of Measure 66, the cuts will continue, and likely even get worse.

Fish and wildlife law enforcement may not be the best known part of our efforts to protect what's best about Oregon. But if we don't fix this problem now, we will see the results the results in the forests, rivers and beaches of Oregon.

Lee Roy Hyder, Oregon State Police Major, (Retired) Fish and Wildlife Division Director

(This information furnished by Patricia McCaig, Friends of Parks and Salmon.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.

ARGUMENT IN OPPOSITION

ISN'T IT TIME FOR OREGON TO TAKE THE HIGH ROAD AGAIN?

Vote NO on Measure 66!

For 25 years I have lived on the Clackamas River. I love this river, and from my travels throughout Oregon I know why it is important to protect Oregon's watersheds. I am also a member of the Clackamas River Basin Council, and I understand the desperate need to adequately fund watershed councils. I agree with Governor Kitzhaber:

"If we are to restore our watersheds and the salmon, steelhead and trout dependent on healthy watersheds, it will take the participation of every Oregonian." (12/18/97 letter to Oregon Plan Partners. Emphasis added.)

The goals of Measure 66 are noble, but do these noble ends justify the means? Measure 66 further legitimizes state run gambling. Not only does it provide added justification for preying on those addicted to gambling, but gambling revenue is becoming a major addiction for Oregon. According to a Time Magazine article entitled "They call it Video Crack":

"In Oregon, between 1995 and 1997, the state budget relied for 9% of its revenue on the lottery system, most of it from video poker. An effort to get rid of video gambling there evaporated this year. 'The state is overwhelmingly dependent' says Peter Bragdon, a lawyer who helped the Governor study the problem." (Time, 6/1/98)

Regardless of whether Measure 66 passes or fails, we will still have state run gambling. But, if we are truly serious about repairing our parks and restoring fish and wildlife habitat, then financing must come from all Oregonians, not from Oregon's gamblers.

To prey on the weak is to abdicate the moral responsibility of all citizens to protect the precious gift of our life support systems and our community. We send the wrong message to ourselves and our children by using gambling to finance government. I urge all Oregonians to vote no on Measure 66 and continue the noble effort to stop state run gambling.

Respectfully,

Lloyd Marbet Oregon Conservancy Foundation cnsrvncy@teleport.com

(This information furnished by Lloyd Marbet.)

(This space purchased for $300 in accordance with ORS 251.255.)
The printing of this argument does not constitute an endorsement by the State of Oregon, nor does the state warrant the accuracy or truth of any statement made in the argument.