Measure 57

Senate Bill 1087-Referred to the Electorate of Oregon by the Legislative Assembly of the 2008 Special Session to be voted on at the General Election, November 4, 2008.

Ballot Title

Increases sentences for drug trafficking, theft against elderly and specified repeat property and identity theft crimes; requires addiction treatment for certain offenders.

Result of "yes" vote

"Yes" vote increases sentences for drug trafficking (methamphetamine, heroin, "ecstasy," cocaine), theft against elderly and specified repeat property and identity theft crimes; requires addiction treatment for certain offenders; establishes this measure as alternative to other specified measure on this ballot to impose minimum sentences for listed crimes.

Result of "no" vote

"No" vote retains current laws, which provide lesser sentences for specified crimes and do not require treatment for addicted offenders.

Summary

This measure increases prison sentences for specified drug and property crimes as follows:

This measure also requires treatment for certain addicted offenders at risk of reoffending; imposes sanctions for those who refuse treatment. Limits court's ability to reduce sentences. Provides grants to counties for operation of local jails, treatment services, intensive supervision and drug courts.

If this measure passes with more votes than other specified measure on this ballot to impose minimum sentences for listed crimes, this measure controls and other measure will have no effect. If this measure passes with fewer votes than other specified measure on this ballot to impose minimum sentences for listed crimes, this measure will have no effect. See Explanatory Statement for more information.

Estimate of financial impact

The measure will require additional state spending of approximately $9 million in the first year, $74 million in the second year, $79 million in the third year, $106 million in the fourth year, and more than $143 million each year after that. The measure does not require additional local government spending.

The state will borrow $314 million from 2010 to 2017 to build new prison space. The state will repay those amounts plus interest of $203 million over 25 years.

The measure does not affect the amount of funds collected for state government.


Explanation of Estimate of Financial Impact

The measure

The measure increases sentences for specific drug and property crimes, and requires addiction treatment for certain criminals. The measure also requires state grants to counties for jail, treatment, and supervision expenses, and for drug court operations.

State impact

The costs of the measure are due to keeping more criminals in prison for longer periods of time. Those costs include: running prisons, providing temporary prison beds, supervising criminals after they are released from prison, and building more prison space. Other costs include: providing foster care for some children whose parents are convicted of the measure's crimes, providing lawyers for defendants who cannot afford legal counsel, defending the state against inmates' lawsuits, and assessing the results of grant-funded addiction treatment.

The measure will cost $9 million in the first year, and increase to more than $143 million per year after the fourth year. These costs include the cost of grants to local government.

The state will borrow $314 million from 2010 to 2017 to build new prison space. The state will repay those amounts plus interest of $203 million over 25 years.

Local impact

The amount of grants to local governments cannot be estimated.

The measure does not require any additional local government spending.

Implementing the measure

The total cost of the measure could change depending on the length of time to build new prisons, inflation, the cost of drug treatment, and the cost to hire and train new prison staff.

The measure does not identify a funding source. Today the costs of prisons are paid for out of the General Fund, which comes from income taxes. The General Fund is also used to pay for public education, services for vulnerable citizens, public safety, and other programs.

Committee Members:

Secretary of State Bill Bradbury
State Treasurer Randall Edwards
Scott Harra, Director, Dept. of Administrative Services
Elizabeth Harchenko, Director, Dept. of Revenue
Debra Guzman, Local Government Representative

(The estimate of financial impact and explanation was provided by the above committee pursuant to ORS 250.127.)