Measure 60

Argument in Opposition

Oregon PTA Asks You to Vote No on Measure 60.

As parents and teachers involved in our schools every day, we urge you to vote no on Measure 60. Measure 60 takes away local control from the principals, school districts and teachers who know our schools best, and places it in the hands of government bureaucrats.

Measure 60 is vague, poorly worded, and full of unintended consequences:

Measure 60 does little to improve our schools, and takes money away from where our schools need it most - in the classroom.

Please join Oregon PTA in voting no on Measure 60.

Oregon PTA

(This information furnished by Anita Olsen, Oregon PTA.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon's Teachers of the Year
Urge You to Vote No on Measure 60.

It Doesn't Help Teachers or Students.

We are teachers representing all corners of Oregon. We all share a deep dedication to our students, their families and our communities. We also share the same humbling honor of being recognized as past Oregon Teachers of Year. We accept this recognition on behalf of the tens of thousands of Oregon teachers who work wonders in classrooms everyday.

Measure 60 is unfair to students and teachers. It is poorly written, vague, unrealistic and unfair. It does nothing to improve our public schools or teaching quality. It is a risky scheme that takes millions of dollars away out of the classroom. Measure 60 doesn't provide more dollars for public education. It doesn't put back lost programs. It doesn't decrease class sizes. It doesn't even improve student learning.

Measure 60 does not promote critical thinking or a well-rounded curriculum that prepares students for the new century. Measure 60 simply forces teachers to prepare students for more standardized tests. Standardized tests measure only a small portion of the successes teachers see each day in the classroom. And logic would dictate that test scores are not a good measure of the incredible work Oregon teachers do in cultivating young minds and preparing students to be life-long learners.

In our teaching careers we've taught thousands of students and worked with hundreds of other teachers. We all know that students learn better when teachers collaborate, but instead of encouraging collaboration between teachers, Measure 60 fosters competition. That is unfair and unrealistic.

Measure 60 works against what teachers do best - teaching! Please join us in voting no on Measure 60.

Allan Bruner, 2006 Teacher of the Year
Catie Thurber-Brown, 2004 Teacher of the Year

(This information furnished by Treasure Mackley, Parents and Teachers Know Better.)


Argument in Opposition

The Oregon Education Association
Asks You To Vote No On Measure 60
Because Every Child In Oregon Counts!

Measure 60 shortchanges our students. Instead of teaching kids to think, solve problems and develop the skills they need to succeed, teachers will be forced to spend their time preparing students for more standardized tests.

Vote No on 60.

Measure 60 is undefined and full of unintended consequences. It creates a statewide bureaucracy for teacher pay based on Bill Sizemore's idea of "classroom performance," but there is no clear definition of how classroom progress would be measured or how it will be implemented. It removes decision-making by local school boards on how each of their teachers should be paid. It creates more bureaucracy and administrative overhead and will cost millions of dollars to implement. These are dollars better spent on investing in programs we know improve Oregon's public schools.

Vote No on 60.

Measure 60 is just another attempt by Bill Sizemore to take money away from our schools. Bill Sizemore's measure will cost Oregon schools millions of dollars that we simply don't have. This is money better spent on textbooks, smaller class sizes or adding back lost programs. Once again, Bill Sizemore, who doesn't even have a background in education, is trying to take away local control from those who know our schools best.

Vote No on 60.

Please join thousands of Oregon public school teachers and me.

Vote NO on Ballot Measure 60.

Larry Wolf, President
Oregon Education Association

(This information furnished by Larry Wolf, President, Oregon Education Association.)


Argument in Opposition

As your former Governor and a ten year School Board Member, I strongly urge Oregonians to vote No on Measure 60.

Improving Oregon schools should be a top priority, but Measure 60 will do just the opposite. With a hefty price tag of $120 million dollars, it will take money out of our classrooms to pay for a complicated bureaucratic process that will not improve student instruction.

Measure 60 will lead to more standardized tests. I have been an advocate for education for over 30 years, because I know that every child is unique and deserves the best education. But Measure 60 will force teachers to teach to the test, instead of teaching children to think, solve problems and develop the skills they need for their future.

Measure 60 is full of unintended consequences. This measure sets no standard for how teachers' performance will be measured, even though their jobs and pay depend on it. Measure 60 takes away the ability of local school districts and elected school boards to decide what's best for their children and communities.

Measure 60 is unfair to the teachers with challenging assignments. Under Measure 60, teachers with the toughest jobs, those with special education students and who teach in low-income areas, will be punished, because their students may not do as well on constrictive standardized tests.

Oregon's children will be short-changed under Measure 60. Say "No" to Bill Sizemore and one more of his anti-Oregon schemes.

Governor Barbara Roberts

(This information furnished by Treasure Mackley, Parents and Teachers Know Better.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon Business Association Opposes Measure 60

Measure 60 is Bad Business for Oregon's Schools.

The Oregon Business Association believes that a healthy business climate depends on strong, vibrant public schools. We're always looking for great new ideas, but Measure 60 isn't one. It's another vague, poorly worded ballot measure that will cause more problems than it solves, and cost our state and our schools millions in unnecessary spending. We do not think it is the right approach.

Vote No on Measure 60.

Oregon Business Association

(This information furnished by Ryan Deckert, Oregon Business Association.)


Argument in Opposition

The Oregon Nurses Association Says
NO on Measure 60.

Measure 60 is unfair to students and teachers!
As nurses, we strive to provide the best medical care to children across Oregon, and we understand that teachers provide a valuable public service by training young minds. Measure 60 is unfair to both students and teachers.

Measure 60 Ignores Oregon's Unique Communities!
Oregon is home to a diverse set of communities: urban, rural and coastal. Like our patients, every community needs specialized care; a treatment for one patient may not work for another. In the same way, solutions that work in Portland might not work in Bend or Baker City. Measure 60 ignores this fact, instead writing a one-size-fits-all prescription for schools, at huge expense.

Measure 60 is unclear and confusing!
Teachers should be rewarded for furthering their education and gaining additional training, and should be respected for dedicating years to their profession, just like nursing professionals. Yet Measure 60 would eliminate these considerations from determining teacher pay and replace them with a system based on "classroom performance."

"Classroom performance" is undefined in Measure 60, as is the system for evaluating it. This really means more testing. Measure 60 will force students and teachers to spend more time preparing for and taking standardized tests, and less time developing critical thinking skills.

Measure 60 will discourage teachers from taking jobs in schools that need them most!
Nurses know firsthand the challenges and dangers of understaffing. Measure 60 would discourage teachers from taking tough assignments because, by tying pay to performance, teachers are encouraged to seek out the best schools, not the schools that need them most. It's already difficult to attract teachers to challenging assignments in underfunded districts. Measure 60 makes this problem worse.

The Oregon Nurses Association cares about all of Oregon's children. Vote no on Measure 60.

(This information furnished by Jack Dempsey, Oregon Nurses Association.)


Argument in Opposition

Confederation of Oregon School Administrators Say
Vote No on 60.

Public school teachers, administrators and parents are working together to ensure that our children are ready to face the challenges of the 21st Century. That's why we oppose Measure 60.

Measure 60 is unfair to students and teachers.

Parents, teachers and principals know that the most important part of the education process is the ability to spend time, one-on-one, with individual students. Measure 60 will prevent teachers from doing what they do best--teaching. Under Measure 60, teachers will spend more time teaching to the test and less time giving individualized attention to students.

Instead of teaching kids to think and problem solve, teachers will focus on test preparation. Measure 60 does not define student or teacher performance, so we have no way of measuring students' or teachers' success.

Students don't need more tests, more red tape and more bureaucracy. It's not good for students and it's no way to run an efficient school. Measure 60 will introduce politics into our classrooms. And that's the last thing our students need.

Measure 60 is unfair to students and teachers.

We urge you to vote "NO" on Measure 60.

Confederation of Oregon School Administrators

(This information furnished by Chuck Bennett, Confederation of Oregon School Administrators.)


Argument in Opposition

Dear Oregon Voter:

I ask you to oppose Measure 60--an unfair and unnecessary measure that threatens our public school system. Measure 60 takes away local control and eliminates a school district's ability to recognize and reward a teacher's experience in the classroom - which is one of the best measures of a quality teacher. This just doesn't make good sense.

The language of the measure is vague and gives no direction as to how teachers' "classroom performance" will be evaluated. Measure 60 will force Oregon to rely on a system that bases teacher pay on how their students perform on standardized tests.

Measure 60 will lead to more standardized testing. Standardized testing does not promote critical thinking or a well-rounded curriculum that prepares students for college or the work force. Standardized tests measure only a small portion of the successes teachers see each day in the classroom.

Measure 60 will cost hundreds of millions of dollars to implement. This is money better spent reinvesting in reducing class size, adding back lost programs, hiring more teachers, fixing leaky roofs or buying new textbooks.

Measure 60 is unfair to teachers. Rather than spending money creating more bureaucracy, we should be investing in the proven tools – such as access to professional development and mentoring – teachers need to help students succeed.

Measure 60 is unsustainable and unpredictable. Oregonians have long advocated for stable and adequate funding for public schools. In other states, funding for performance-based pay is unsustainable and programs often run out of money. Districts will not be able to predict what their budget will be from year to year, which will directly harm programs for students.

I urge my fellow Oregonians who want the best public schools to join me in voting No on Measure 60.

Sincerely,

Ted Kulongoski

Governor

(This information furnished by Governor Ted Kulongoski.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 60: Another Bad Idea for Working Families

Measure 60 is vague and full of unintended consequences. If passed, teachers' jobs and pay would depend on performance standards that aren't even spelled out in the law. And, Measure 60 doesn't define student performance either, so we have no way of assessing teachers' impact on their students.

Measure 60 takes away local control. Even its supporters don't know what Measure 60 would do. All we do know is that instead of letting local school districts work with principals, teachers, parents and school boards to provide the best education for all of their students, Measure 60 just creates more confusing bureaucracy.

Measure 60 is another bad idea from racketeer Bill Sizemore. In 2000, Oregon voters rejected a similar measure by over 60%. But that didn't stop Bill Sizemore from putting yet another initiative on the ballot to take away money and control from our local schools. What part of "No" doesn't Bill Sizemore understand? Voters have already said "No" but Bill Sizemore doesn't understand.

Oregon's working families reject false "solutions" to Oregon's education challenges. Measure 60 is bad for kids, bad for schools and bad for Oregon.

Please Vote No on Measure 60.

Oregon AFL-CIO

(This information furnished by Kathryn Grover, Oregon AFL-CIO.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 60 takes away local control.
We don't need bureaucrats in Salem to tell communities how to pay their teachers, or which teachers to hire or fire. Let our locally elected school boards do their job.

Measure 60 is wasteful.
Measure 60 adds a new level of bureaucracy that will cost millions to establish and maintain. That money belongs in the classroom, not creating more bureaucracy.

Measure 60 is unrealistic.
Standardized tests aren't the answer, and neither is more "teaching to the test." Children need to do more than memorize facts--they also need to learn to cooperate with others and to think clearly--skills not measured on tests alone.

Measure 60 sidetracks Oregonians from the real issues our schools face.
Schools need real solutions, not attempts at a quick fix that cost millions of dollars. Oregon's schools need stable funding, smaller classes and more teachers, not Measure 60.

Vote "No" on Measure 60.

American Association of University Women of Oregon

(This information furnished by Treasure Mackley, Parents and Teachers Know Better.)


Argument in Opposition

NONPROFIT CHALKBOARD PROJECT STRONGLY OPPOSES MEASURE 60

The Chalkboard Project and its parent organization, Foundations for a Better Oregon, rarely take positions on ballot measures. But we oppose Measure 60 so strongly that we were among the first to speak out against it. We urge you to vote NO.

This measure undermines the significant efforts local districts are making to support their teachers with professional development, comprehensive performance evaluations and new career options. These pilot projects in Sherwood, Tillamook and Forest Grove come from the ground up. Local teachers are designing these projects with the aim of enhancing student performance.

Ballot Measure 60 takes just the opposite approach. It is a simplistic one-size-fits-all mandate from the state.

Our research shows the best way to raise student achievement is to make sure there is an excellent teacher in every classroom. Yet one of the biggest challenges facing schools is that Oregon loses more than a third of its new teachers within five years. Ballot Measure 60 does nothing to help. Our collective efforts need to focus on supporting these new teachers, fostering their creative energies and mentoring them into the best practices of their profession.

The Chalkboard Project is an independent nonprofit organization funded by 25 foundations. There is a broad diversity of political views among the citizens that make up our movement, with Democrats, Republicans and Independents alike. We are united in our goal to make Oregon schools among the best in the nation. We urge you to vote NO on Measure 60.

Orcilia Z˙˝iga Forbes, Chair, Chalkboard Project Board of Directors

(This information furnished by Phil Donovan, Chalkboard Project.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon Democratic Party Urges a
No Vote on Measure 60

Teachers are most effective when they spend quality instructional time with their students. In that environment, students learn to think, solve problems and develop the skills they need to succeed. Measure 60 would base teacher pay on undefined "classroom performance," leading to a system of evaluation that includes even more standardized testing. This imposes a heavy burden on teachers, principals and students with little impact on student success.

Bill Sizemore, the man behind Measure 60, is not an educator. In fact, he is a racketeer whose organization has been caught multiple times forging signatures and committing fraud on petitions to qualify measures for the ballot. Often these measures are hostile to public education and the teachers who want to see our kids succeed. Measure 60 is no exception.

Teachers spend years building experience and often continue their own education while working, gaining certifications and advanced degrees. Measure 60 would remove these factors as consideration for salary increases. And since those teachers who teach in the best schools would earn more money, underperforming schools would have little chance of attracting the teachers needed to improve achievement.

If Measure 60 seems out of touch with Oregon values, it might be because the main funder doesn't live here. Loren Parks, who is a wealthy Nevada businessman, has provided over 80% of the cash used to promote Measure 60. Sizemore's out-of-state benefactor has a history of funding ideologically driven causes, but no record of improving Oregon schools.

Oregon voters defeated a similar measure in 2000 by an overwhelming margin. We weren't fooled then, and we won't be fooled this time.

Measure 60 is bad education policy, pure and simple. It harms teachers, students and our schools.

Vote no on Measure 60.

Oregon Democratic Party

(This information furnished by Meredith Wood Smith, Democratic Party of Oregon.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 60 — Bad, bad and bad

Measure 60 is bad for students, bad for teachers and bad for Oregon.

Oregon AFSCME Council 75 (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) opposes Measure 60. It doesn't make any sense. This measure says that teachers should be paid based on how they perform — and then the measure doesn't explain how they will be evaluated. It doesn't explain what that means. It's not only an unfunded mandate, it's an "unthought-out" mandate.

The only way to make this poorly written and foolish measure work is to base it on test scores. We do not need more test scores. Testing isn't a reliable way to evaluate a teacher's ability and skill. Studies show that tests may not even be a good way to evaluate students. Combine that with the fact that you are tying a teacher's pay to performance on a test and the teachers are forced to teach to the test. This measure will force teachers to focus only on the test and not on making sure all their kids are truly learning.

Measure 60 won't make better teachers, it just punishes students. The end result will be that the students with the best test scores will get the highest-paid teachers. Just like under Bush's No Child Left Behind Act, the students in the most need will get the least resources. Public education is about giving every student the equal opportunity to succeed. This measure is the opposite of that.

This measure leaves force schools to spend an unknown amount of money to implement this foolish measure. Do we need to spend more money to develop more tests so that we can shortchange students? We don't think so.

Let's give all students the tools they need to succeed.

Vote NO! on Measure 60.

(This information furnished by Joe Baessler, Oregon AFSCME Council 75.)


Argument in Opposition

The Service Employees International Union represents 51,000 Oregon workers. Our members are frontline workers who pave our roads and staff our universities. We are health care and child care providers. We clean buildings and we protect abused and neglected kids. Our members are strong supporters of a high quality public education system that gives all of our children the best chance for a successful future.

SEIU's members oppose Measure 60 because it takes away local control of parents, school districts and principles to decide what's best for our schools and students.

Measure 60 is so poorly worded that it leaves our local teachers and districts without any definition of how teachers will be judged or who will be judging them, even though their jobs and pay depend on it. That will leave critical decisions about our teachers and schools in the hands of Salem bureaucrats.

Measure 60 is unfair to our children. Just like George Bush's No Child Left Behind Act, Measure 60 will result in more standardized testing. Forcing teachers to "teach to the test" instead of preparing our children for the future.

Bill Sizemore, a racketeer with no background in education, is the man behind the measure. And this isn't his first time; in 2000 Oregonians rejected a similar measure by a vast majority.

SEIU's 51,000 Oregon members urge you to join with us and Vote No on Measure 60.

John "Marty" Olson

(This information furnished by Arthur Towers, Political Director, SEIU Local 503.)


Argument in Opposition

Please join us in voting NO on Measure 60

Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon Urges You to
Vote No on Measure 60

Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon is a statewide association of Christian denominations, congregations, ecumenical organizations and interfaith partners. Our mission is to bring together Oregon's diverse faith community for dialogue, ministry and community ministries in service to God's people and creation.

People of Faith are called to protect the most vulnerable among us, especially children. Measure 60 does not protect Oregon's children.

Good teachers are the key to improving student learning, particularly in high-poverty areas. When children live in poverty and come to school hungry, their academic progress, especially on standardized tests, is adversely affected. Good teachers help struggling students catch up, often in only a few years.

Because Measure 60 relies excessively on standardized testing, good teachers who work in schools with large numbers of poor children may be evaluated unfairly due to conditions beyond their control. Measure 60 will also require new bureaucracy to implement and monitor it, and divert precious state resources from critical needs of both schools and efforts to reduce poverty.

We desperately need to recruit and retain Oregon's best teachers willing to serve where they are most needed. But Measure 60 will produce the opposite effect: it will drive the best teachers from the very schools where they can make the biggest difference in the lives of Oregon's most vulnerable children.

Moving toward a performance-based system that undermines teacher commitment to quality education for all of Oregon's children and increases competition rather than collaboration among teachers is a bad idea. It will lead to loss of qualified teachers from our schools.

Please join us in voting NO on Measure 60

Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon

(This information furnished by Kevin Finney, Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon.)


Argument in Opposition

Rural Oregonians Urge a No Vote on Measure 60

Measure 60 takes money out of our classrooms.
Measure 60 will cost millions of dollars a year to implement and rural communities could be hit hard. Measure 60 could force local school districts to divert money away from critical programs and classroom necessities and into a complicated bureaucratic process.

Measure 60 will result in more testing.
Rural school districts already struggle with No Child Left Behind. Measure 60 will require even more standardized testing and force teachers to teach to the test. What's worse, Measure 60 does not define student performance, so we have no way of assessing teachers' impact on their students.

Measure 60 takes away local control from local school districts.
Measure 60 puts critical decisions about our local schools into the hands of Salem bureaucrats. It does not define how teacher's performance will be measured, even though their jobs and pay depend on it. Nor does it define who is judging teachers or how they are being judged.

Oregonians have already said No to Measure 60.
In 2000, Oregonians rejected a similar ballot measure by an overwhelming majority of more than 60%. This is just another attempt by Bill Sizemore to take money away from our local schools and mislead Oregon voters.

Since 1992, The Rural Organizing Project has given a voice to rural Oregonians.

We urge you to vote No on Measure 60.

Rural Organizing Project

(This information furnished by Amy Dudley, Rural Organizing Project.)


Argument in Opposition

The Oregon Association for the Education of
Young Children Opposes Measure 60

The Oregon Association for the Education of Young Children is dedicated to improving the quality of educational and developmental services that enhance the well-being of all young children. We know that teachers are on the front lines, meeting this challenge every day. They deserve our support. That's why we oppose Measure 60.

Teachers earn a modest salary in return for educating our children in a tough working environment. They can expect to earn more after years of dedication or by continuing their education and gaining certifications. In some cases, teachers who take on tough assignments at underperforming schools earn incentives, like assistance repaying their student loans.

Measure 60 would undermine – or end outright – these few pathways to increased compensation. Instead, Measure 60 would pay teachers according to "classroom performance." This is troubling for many reasons:

  1. Since Measure 60 bases pay on "classroom performance," teachers who work in underperforming schools are unlikely to get pay increases. It is already difficult to attract quality teachers to these challenging assignments. Measure 60 would make this task even harder.
  2. Oregon students already dedicate many hours preparing for and taking standardized tests. In order to judge "classroom performance," we can count on an even more extensive system of standardized tests. Do you want more tests or a strong, well-rounded education?
  3. The state of Oregon doesn't yet have standardized tests for some subjects and grade levels, so tests will have to be developed. It would cost Oregon $9 million to develop new test standards and scoring systems. Oregonians would then have to pay $60 million a year to maintain the program.

Measure 60 is unfair to teachers, students, and Oregonians.
Vote no on Measure 60.

Oregon Association for the Education of Young Children

(This information furnished by Treasure Mackley, Parents & Teachers Know Better.)


Argument in Opposition

I am an Oregon teacher. This fall will be my ninth year teaching special education. As I prepare to receive my students and plan lessons, I am worried about what the future will look like for my students and me if Ballot Measure 60 passes. Measure 60 is unfair to teachers and bad for students.

The measure is poorly written, vague, and unrealistic. It assumes that "classroom performance" is something that is easily measured with universal criteria that can be fairly and equally applied. That's just not true. What is true is that this measure will result in more standardized testing.

I didn't enter into teaching to spend my time as a drill instructor, cranking out good test takers. I chose this profession because I want to help kids learn, grow and succeed in the classroom and in life. Measure 60 does nothing to help students succeed.

What helps me succeed as a teacher is learning from and sharing ideas with my fellow teachers. Students learn better when their teachers collaborate, but instead of encouraging collaboration, Measure 60 forces teachers to compete with each other. Measure 60 does nothing to ensure that students receive a quality education.

Teaching is a calling for me, not just a profession. But if Measure 60 passes I don't know if I'll be able to continue working in the classroom. Under this measure, teachers won't know what their salary will be from year to year and won't be able to plan their family budgets.

Oregonians have already said no to this bad idea before. Let's do it again. Please join me in voting no on Measure 60.

Sincerely,

Jennifer Nelson
Special Education Teacher
Rainier School District

(This information furnished by Treasure Mackley, Parents & Teachers Know Better.)


Argument in Opposition

School Board Members Oppose Measure 60

We care about our schools, our children and our communities, which is why we have dedicated our time to serve on our local school boards. We've been elected by our communities to decide what's best for our neighborhood schools. We are opposed to Measure 60.

Measure 60 will take away the ability of local school boards and communities to decide what's best for our children. Instead, Measure 60 will place these critical decisions in the hands of government bureaucrats.

Measure 60 will force our local teachers to "teach to the test" and take away valuable classroom instruction time that prepares our students for the real world. It imposes a heavy burden on teachers, students and school principles with little impact on student success.

Measure 60 will divert money from our local classrooms and into a complicated bureaucratic program. Measure 60 will cost Oregon schools millions of dollars to implement and manage, but it doesn't define how a teacher's performance will be measured, who is judging teachers or how they are being judged.

Measure 60 has been rejected by Oregonians once before. As local school board members, we listen to our communities and our constituencies. Oregonians have spoken out loud and clear, rejecting a similar ballot measure in 2000.

Because we care about our schools and our communities, we are speaking out and urging Oregon voters to reject Measure 60. It's not good for students or our schools.

Please Vote No on Measure 60.

Linda Brown, Lake Oswego School Board Member

Anne Schuster, Corvallis 509J School Board Member

(This information furnished by Treasure Mackley, Parents & Teachers Know Better.)


Argument in Opposition

Support your kids and mine by voting no on Measure 60.

We are parents of kids in Oregon public schools. We believe that a strong public education system is the most important thing in a society. That's why our kids attend public schools and we volunteer in their classrooms.

Every time we volunteer, we see all of the challenges and rewards that our children's teachers face every day. As a whole, they are talented, dedicated, and as determined as we are to making sure our kids get the kind of well-rounded education they need to succeed as adults. But every time we volunteer, we also see the roadblocks to that success that statewide mandates and standardized testing present.

We're concerned that Measure 60 would add another layer of standardized tests to our children's curriculum because it requires teachers to be paid based on "classroom performance." Rather than focusing on the kids and leading their natural interests into learning experiences, the teachers will be forced to fill out reams of paperwork and follow rigid guidelines to "teach to the test" of the standardized tests that already plague our schools.

And Measure 60 would add another statewide mandate that would take away local control from teachers and principals. Just what we DON'T need in our schools – a misguided, costly, one-size-fits-all bad idea masquerading as a solution.

Sure, there are plenty of things that our schools need. More volunteers like us, smaller class sizes, and state-of-the-art facilities. But Measure 60 won't accomplish any of those things with its vague, poorly worded proposals and their unintended consequences.

Please, help us help our kids, and vote no on Measure 60.
Thank you.

Sincerely,

Karen Starchvick, Parent
Medford

Janeen Sollman, Parent
Hillsboro

(This information furnished by Treasure Mackley, Parents & Teachers Know Better.)


Argument in Opposition

Dear Oregon Voter,

The most important part of my job as Superintendent of Public Instruction is making sure that all students in our public schools have an equal opportunity to learn the academic and life lessons that will prepare them for work or college.

We are very fortunate in Oregon to have dedicated, quality teachers who help their students reach their maximum potential. Oregonians place a high value on our public schools and have a strong tradition of supporting teachers. That's why I urge you to vote NO on Measure 60.

Measure 60 is unfair to teachers. This measure is so poorly worded that it does not even define how a teacher's performance will be measured, even though their jobs and pay depend on it.

Measure 60 takes away local control from the teachers, principals and locally elected school boards who know what's best for their schools. At a time when many of our schools are facing new challenges, this measure is just another distraction from the pressing needs of our schools and students.

Measure 60 will cost millions of dollars and take money away from the classroom where it is needed most. A non-partisan review of this measure concluded that it will cost at least thirty million dollars a year to implement. That money would be better spent reducing class size, hiring more teachers or buying new books and computers.

We've seen this type of vague, poorly worded measure before. In 2000, Oregon voters overwhelmingly rejected a similar measure. Oregonians have already said no to this bad idea because of all the unintended consequences for our schools.

I urge every Oregonian to vote NO on Measure 60. Send a message that we won't be fooled by deceptive ballot measures that do nothing to improve our schools.

Sincerely,

Susan Castillo
Superintendent of Public Instruction

(This information furnished by Susan Castillo, Superintendent of Public Instruction.)


Argument in Opposition

Dear Fellow Voter,

The Oregon School Employees Association (OSEA) represents over 21,000 educational employees working in Oregon school districts, community colleges, educational service districts, Head Start agencies, libraries, and park and recreation districts.

Our organization represents the second largest membership of educational staff in Oregon, from special education, instructional, and library assistants, to school secretaries, custodians and many more.

Our members serve as education support professionals in schools all across the state. It is this unique role that enables us to speak confidently about the pitfalls of Measure 60.

Measure 60 is not fair to teachers or students. Every day our members see the challenges teachers face in the classroom, but Measure 60 will unfairly punish those teachers who take on the most challenging positions, like special education or working with homeless students.

Measure 60 is bad for Oregon students. Instead to teaching students to think, solve problems and prepare for their future, Measure 60 will force teachers to focus on preparing students to take standardized tests or risk losing potential earnings.

Measure 60 takes money out of our classrooms. Measure 60 will divert over $120 million dollars from our classrooms and force schools to spend that money on developing a complicated bureaucratic process. Measure 60 takes money and resources away from what our schools need the most, smaller class sizes and adequate learning materials such as up-to-date textbooks.

OSEA's members continue to work every day to help our students learn and grow.

Please join us in voting No on Measure 60.

The 21,000 members of the Oregon School Employees Association

Oregon School Employees Association

(This information furnished by Merlene Martin, President, Oregon School Employees Association.)


Argument in Opposition

Join Stand for Children in Voting Against Measure 60

Stand for Children is a citizen voice for children. Our mission is to teach everyday people how to join together in an effective grassroots voice in order to win concrete, long-lasting improvements for children at both state and local levels.

We believe that every child is an individual and that every child counts. Measure 60 would force teachers to give less attention to students with special needs, which means that some will be left behind. That is unfair and unnecessary.

Measure 60 is unfair.

Measure 60 sends a message to teachers that their pay is based on the progress of the entire class, not the progress of individual students. No one wants a system where one child may be sacrificed because they didn't catch on as quickly.

Measure 60 says that the only kind of progress worth rewarding is the kind that can be measured on a standardized test.

Different students learn things at different times and in different ways. If teachers are forced to leave one student behind to focus on the rest of the class, we are failing all students.

Measure 60 will leave our at-risk and special needs students behind.

At a time when our students need more individualized attention, Measure 60 creates more bureaucracy, more tests and more paperwork for our teachers to fill out. Teachers will have less time to give one-on-one attention.

Measure 60 will hurt, not help, the neediest children in Oregon. We urge you to vote "NO" and to ensure all children have the opportunity to reach their full potential.

Stand for Children

(This information furnished by Jonah Edelman, Stand for Children.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon's Education Professionals Oppose Measure 60.

Measure 60 has no merit – it's a vague, poorly worded measure that will punish those who take on the most challenging assignments.

Measure 60 will punish teachers who work in low-income areas or have a lot of special education students by paying them less if their students do not perform well on standardized tests.
Measure 60 will saddle students with more standardized testing and more teaching to the test, which will mean less individual attention and classroom time.
Measure 60 is costly and takes money away from classroom. The millions estimated to implement this measure would be better spent on reinvesting in smaller classrooms, adding back lost programs, hiring more teachers, fixing leaky roofs or buying more textbooks.
Measure 60 has been rejected by voters before. In 2000, more than 60 percent of voters rejected a similar measure.

Public schools need our support to focus on students' learning experience as a whole, not just their scores on standardized tests. Measure 60 will impose a heavy burden on teachers and schools, and will not improve student success.

Education professionals of American Federation of Teachers-Oregon ask that you join them in voting No on Measure 60.

American Federation of Teachers-Oregon

(This information furnished by Mark Schwebke, President, American Federation of Teachers- Oregon.)


Argument in Opposition

The Elders in Action Commission
Urges You To Oppose Measure 60

Don't fall for Measure 60. The proponents want you to believe that they want to reward good teachers and get rid of inadequate teachers. We've studied the issue. Here's the truth about Measure 60.

They Say: "Measure 60 will help schools get rid of bad teachers."
The Truth: Nobody wants to see a bad teacher in our classrooms, least of all other teachers. The Oregon Legislature has ended teacher tenure, and poorly performing teachers are shipped out if they don't shape up. Measure 60 will do nothing to weed out bad teachers.

They Say: "Measure 60 will make our schools more efficient, like a business."
The Truth: Measure 60 will add another layer of bureaucracy to our public school system, which will cost millions to implement and maintain. Think of how many teachers we could hire or how many new books or computers we could buy with that money!

They Say: "Measure 60 will help us more accurately measure student performance."
The Truth: Measure 60 sets up a system where standardized test scores are the only way to measure a student's performance. Measure 60 does not consider external factors that impact our students. Students don't all have the same skills and abilities--some have special needs that can impact their progress. Others live in poverty, come to school hungry, or come from troubled families – all factors which can affect their progress. Measure 60 draws attention away from kids who need special help and reduces their value to a score on a standardized test.

Don't deal another blow to our public schools.

Vote "NO" vote on Measure 60.

The Elders in Action Commission, a powerful voice of older adults since 1968, has been tackling important issues that affect the quality of life of Oregonians, and has helped shape the aging policy on all levels.

(This information furnished by Treasure Mackley, Parents & Teachers Know Better.)


Argument in Opposition

Parents & Teachers Know Better OPPOSES Measure 60
Because it takes local control of classrooms
away from the teachers, parents, and principals
who know our schools the best

Here are just some of the groups from around the state who
OPPOSE Measure 60:

Oregon PTA
The Oregon Education Association
Oregon School Employees Association
American Federation of Teachers-Oregon
Confederation of Oregon School Administrators
Stand for Children
The Chalkboard Project
Oregon Association for the Education of Young Children
Oregon Alliance of Retired Americans
Oregon Business Association
Elders in Action Commission
Oregon Nurses Association
Oregon State Fire Fighters Council
Oregon Democratic Party
Ted Kulongoski Governor
Governor Barbara Roberts
Susan Castillo Superintendent of Public Instruction
Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon
SEIU Oregon State Council
SEIU Local 49
SEIU Local 503
Oregon AFSCME Council 75
Working Families Party of Oregon
Oregon AFL-CIO
PCUN
Rural Organizing Project
Tax Fairness Oregon
Basic Rights Oregon
American Association of University Women of Oregon
Community Action Partnership of Oregon
Community Alliance of Tenants
NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon
ONE Voice for Child Care
Adelante Mujeres
Carpenters Local 247
Multnomah County Democrats
PSU Chapter- American Association of University Professors
Eugene- Springfield Solidarity Network/Jobs with Justice
Representative Diane Rosenbaum
Senator Richard Devlin
Senator Suzanne Bonamici
Senator Rod Monroe
Portland Jobs with Justice
Catie Thurber-Brown, 2004 Teacher of the Year
Allan Bruner, 2006 Teacher of the Year

For more information:
www.parentsandteachersknowbetter.com

(This information furnished by Treasure Mackley, Parents & Teachers Know Better.)