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Measure 48

Argument in Opposition

Measure 48 Creates "Rainy Day Fund" that Cannot be Spent

NO on 48

Supporters of Measure 48 call it a "Rainy Day Amendment," because it would cap any increase in state spending to inflation and population growth only. That would withhold about $2.2 billion from the next 2-year ("biennium") budget – almost 6% of expected state revenues. They argue this $2.2 billion surplus (and future ones) will create a "rainy day" fund.

We should not set aside a "rainy day" fund, until the state invests enough in providing public infrastructure and services.

The state is currently doing too little to provide education and health care for Oregonians, sufficient public transportation or parks, or even food for hungry children or rehabilitation for the homeless. For many Oregonians, it is already raining, hard. Measure 48 would cap the increase in state spending in the 2007-09 biennium to about 8% over the previous biennium, no matter that the additional $2.2 billion in revenue is available and needed.

Measure 48 makes it too difficult to spend the "rainy day" surplus.

These surplus funds can be spent, under the cap, only if state revenues grow slower than inflation plus population growth, which happens in only recessions. Even then, state spending would remain capped, despite the need for higher unemployment benefit payments ($1.3 billion more in the 2001 recession). The surplus funds could be spent, above the cap, only after a 2/3 vote of both houses of the Oregon Legislature and a statewide majority vote in a November general election–which happens in the 17th month of the 24-month biennium. This will leave public services in grave risk.

Use Corporate Kicker for a "Rainy Day Fund"

The corporate share of Oregon income taxes has declined from 18% to about 4%. The "kicker" cut $133 million from these taxes in 2005 and is expected to cut $205 million in 2007. The top 4% of corporations get 93% of this money.

(This information furnished by Dan Meek.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 48 is a False Promise

I know, because I saw what it did to my home state of Colorado.

I'm a mom, a small business owner and a member of the Colorado PTA. I have first-hand experience with a constitutional amendment like Measure 48.

Measure 48 is modeled on Colorado's constitutional amendment called TABOR, which was enacted 13 years ago. It has been a complete failure. Measure 48 has the same core provisions as Colorado's TABOR.

Measure 48 inserts the Colorado flawed formula, "population + inflation," into Oregon's Constitution.

We learned the hard way. TABOR, like Measure 48, was sold to us with promises and sound bites that it did not live up to.

TABOR did not give control to the voters. It did not increase government accountability.

Instead, it has been complicated, unwieldy, and has had many unintended consequences.

Under the flawed formula in the Measure 48 Constitutional Amendment,
Colorado went backwards.

K-12 education:

  • Average teacher salary compared to average pay in other occupations declined from 30th to 50th in the nation.
  • Spending on K-12 education dropped from 35th to 49th in the nation.

Higher education:

  • Higher education funding dropped from 35th to 48th in the nation.
  • Under TABOR, higher education funding per resident student dropped by 31 percent.

Health care:

  • The proportion of low-income children without health insurance doubled. Colorado now ranks last in the nation.
  • Access to prenatal care plummeted from 23rd to 48th in the nation.

Finally, last November, we Colorado voters said, "enough." We passed a referendum to suspend TABOR so that our state could start to dig out of our TABOR mess. We still have a ways to go.

Measure 48 is flawed and will hurt Oregon.
Just like it hurt Colorado.

For more information:
www.defendoregon.org

Kristi Hargrove
Member of the Colorado PTA and small business owner

(This information furnished by Kristi Hargrove.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon Teachers Urge You to
Vote NO on Ballot Measure 48

We are teachers from across Oregon and we work in school districts large and small, urban and rural. We believe that Ballot Measure 48 will harm Oregon's schools.

Ballot Measure 48 would mean deep and painful cuts to our public schools.

Our public school children cannot learn in larger classrooms or with shortened school years. But that's exactly what Measure 48 will mean.

This Measure will amend the state Constitution and will force painful and untargeted cuts to Oregon's K-12 education system. We've learned the lesson from the Colorado version of this measure.

Here's what happened in Colorado:

  • K-12 spending under this measure dropped from 35th to 49th in the country
  • Colorado fell to 41st in the nation in student to teacher ratio

Oregon's children are our state's greatest resource. Every Oregon child deserves a classroom where he or she can learn, not one that is over-crowded and chaotic. Every Oregon child deserves the educational programs that will prepare him or her for the future.

The state's economy is just now recovering and we're beginning to see reinvestments in our public schools. We don't want to go back to the days where school doors closed early.

Measure 48 will take us backwards and has unintended consequences.

Oregon's kids are counting on us not to backslide. The time to invest in Oregon's future is now.

Please Vote No on Ballot Measure 48

Caryn Connolly, Coquille High School Social Studies Teacher
Dennis Storey, Second Grade Teacher, Kelly Creek Elementary School, Gresham
Rebecca Levison, Sixth Grade Teacher, Clarendon Elementary, Portland
David Wilkinson, English Teacher, Westview High School, Beaverton
Steve Anderson, Hermiston High School English Teacher
Cheryl Lashley, Third Grade Teacher, Howard Elementary School, Medford

(This information furnished by Larry Wolf, President, Oregon Education Association.)


Argument in Opposition

AARP Oregon urges "NO" vote on Measure 48

AARP Oregon strongly supports accountable government and effective programs that help not only older residents but their children, grandchildren and all Oregonians.

With Measure 48, the devil is in the details.

Measure 48 will not make government more accountable and will have serious and eventually devastating consequences on crucial state services and the overall economy.

Measure 48 uses an extremely flawed formula that fails to account for:

  • the real cost of sustaining critical services to children and seniors, like the rising costs of health care and energy bills; and
  • our state's changing demographics with the aging of Oregon boomers.

Each greatly magnifies the impact on state revenues and expenses and the vital services that Oregonians rely on.

Ballot Measure 48 will cut $1.1 billion a year from the budget. The measure is a budgetary straitjacket that will gut critical services and cut at the heart of the things all Oregonians need and rely on, including public safety, schools and health care - cuts that we know lead to even greater costs down the road.

Measure 48 is so confusing and poorly written that it may even be retroactive.

The measure is part of a nationwide effort led by special interests to import to our state the flawed "Taxpayer Bill of Rights" (TABOR) initiative that failed in Colorado.

The results:

  • Colorado businesses and economy stagnated with negative job growth; and
  • K-12 and higher education systems were gutted, roads and bridges crumbled, and the number of uninsured nearly doubled.

The response: a broad and diverse coalition of Colorado's business, community, education, government and labor leaders – along with the state's voters – banded together to suspend TABOR.

Let's learn from another state's mistake, instead of making the same one.
Let's not write Measure 48's flawed formula into Oregon's Constitution.

Vote "NO" on Measure 48.

(This information furnished by Jerry Cohen, State Director, Ray Miao, State President; AARP Oregon.)


Argument in Opposition

The Oregon PTA urges a NO vote on Measure 48

Measure 48 is a constitutional amendment that will send Oregon backwards at exactly the wrong time. The state recession hit Oregon's K-12 schools hard. We won't soon forget the drastic funding cuts that left our kids with crowded classrooms, outdated textbooks, and shortened school years.

A wealthy New York developer named Howard Rich has put Measure 48 on the Oregon ballot. He has spent more than $1 million to pay for signature gathering in Oregon and paid for 85% of Measure 48. Howard Rich doesn't live here. His children do not go to our schools. He will not face the consequences of Measure 48. We will.

Education funding and the quality of education plummeted in Colorado under a Measure 48 style law. Colorado's education funding got stuck in the recession and they were unable to move forward. Spending on K-12 dropped from 35th in the nation to 49th

Measure 48 is even more extreme than Colorado's version and will hit Oregon harder. The Oregon version of Measure 48 is more limiting than Colorado's and local schools in Oregon will be even more vulnerable to deep funding cuts.

Measure 48 is so poorly written that it could be retroactive. This will be up to the courts to decide. If it goes into effect immediately, it means that Oregon's schools will be forced to cut their budgets for the 2007 school year.

We need a plan for Oregon's schools that will bring certainty, not chaos.

The Oregon PTA says vote NO on Measure 48

For more information on how Measure 48
will hurt K-12 education:

www.DefendOregon.Org

Anita Olsen,
Oregon PTA, President-elect
Portland, Oregon

Diana Oberbarnscheidt,
Oregon PTA, Past president
Bend, Oregon

Michael Thirkill,
Oregon PTA member
Talent, Oregon

Corinne Stonier,
Oregon PTA Member
Hillsboro, Oregon

(This information furnished by Anita Olsen, President-elect, Oregon PTA.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 48 Would Devastate Oregon Schools

Oregon Education Association
Urges You to Vote "NO" on Measure 48

Measure 48 is a Flawed Formula that didn't work for Colorado public schools. The measure will significantly reduce revenue available for schools, health care and public safety.

After 13 years under the same Constitutional amendment, Colorado's public education system declined. High school graduation rates plummeted and:

  • Spending on K-12: Dropped from 35th in the nation to 49th
  • Teacher salaries: Dropped from 30th in the nation to 50th

The best way to predict how Measure 48 would affect our future is to look to the past. If Oregon had been operating under Measure 48's Flawed Formula since 1990, we'd have 25 percent less funding than we do today for education, health care and other basic services.

Here is how four districts across the state would look today, after 16 years of Measure 48:

  • Beaverton School District: a cut of $38.02 million – the equivalent of reducing the school year 36 days or eliminating 551 teachers;


  • Salem-Keizer School District: a cut of $41.3 million – the equivalent of increasing class size 13 students in every class;


  • Bend-La Pine School District: a $15.2 million cut – the equivalent of eliminating 201 teachers and,


  • Roseburg Public Schools: a $7 million cut – the equivalent of reducing the school year 31 days and cutting 98 teachers.

Measure 48 is so complicated and poorly written that it may be retroactive – cutting more than $2.5 billion from the current budget. This would force school districts around the state to make painful choices to balance their budgets – like reducing school days, cutting teachers and increasing class size.

More than 85% of the funding to get Measure 48 on the ballot came from New York developer, Howard Rich. Don't let out-of-state special interests harm Oregon's schools.

Support Your Local School
Join 45,000 teachers and education professionals in voting
"No"

Larry Wolf, President
Oregon Education Association

(This information furnished by Larry Wolf, President, Oregon Education Association.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 48 is a false promise
and a political statement

Just ask the measure sponsor

Proponents of Measure 48 are playing fast and loose with the truth in their campaign propaganda. They are making big claims about what Measure 48 will do.

But the measure sponsor had to admit the truth in an official letter to the Secretary of State:

"Notice, in and of itself, the amendment does not create a rainy day fund. That is the province of the legislative assembly."

Measure 48 Chief Sponsor Don McIntire
Letter to the Secretary of State, Elections Division
August 9, 2004

When asked to explain why the campaign is calling their measure something it's not, Mr. McIntire said, "It's a political statement." (Source: KATU, July 3, 2006.)

Get the facts
Get the truth
Defend Oregon

www.DefendOregon.Org

(This information furnished by Phil Donovan, Campaign Manager, Defend Oregon Coalition.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon Fire Fighters Urge a No Vote on Ballot Measure 48

If Oregon experienced a devastating earthquake, forest fire, chemical spill or other type of disaster, we would need additional resources to adequately respond. Ballot Measure 48 requires a two-thirds vote of the legislature and a vote of the people in a November election to approve necessary emergency funds.

We can't wait for an election.

First responders need immediate access to the state resources necessary to protect Oregonians.

As fire fighters working across the state to keep communities safe, we need the ability to respond immediately to emergencies.

Ballot Measure 48 would make it harder to respond to emergencies.

Ballot Measure 48 eliminates $1.1 billion a year from the state budget. This would result in decreased funding for local public safety, emergency responders and the state police - the very people Oregonians depend on for rapid responses to emergencies.

We live in a time where we have to be constantly vigilant and prepared for emergencies and natural disasters.

Ballot Measure 48 not only cuts funding for critical public safety services, it also puts up unnecessary and dangerous hurdles to our emergency response efforts.

Measure 48 is being promoted by out-of-state special interests who have no stake in the safety of our communities. More than 85% of the funding to get Ballot Measure 48 on the ballot came from New York developer, Howard Rich.

Don't get burned by out-of-state, special interests.

As fire fighters, we work on the front lines and we have seen firsthand the damaging results of budget cuts to our critical public safety system. We can't afford cuts to vital public services. And we need flexibility in our emergency response efforts.

Ballot Measure 48 harms our ability to keep communities around Oregon safe.

Join Your Local Fire Fighters in Voting "No" on Ballot Measure 48.
For more information visit: www.defendoregon.org

Kelly Bach, President
Oregon State Fire Fighters Council

(This information furnished by Kelly Bach, President, Oregon State Fire Fighters Council.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 48 will make Oregon less safe

Sheriffs from around Oregon
urge you to vote NO on Measure 48

One thing we learn early in law enforcement is to look at the evidence. We have looked at Measure 48, and here's what it shows:

Look at the evidence from Colorado:

  • Colorado has eliminated the mental health program in youth corrections
  • Deep budget cuts have meant that in Colorado, court hearings are delayed and criminals stay on the street.
  • Colorado public safety was pitted against schools, health care, transportation and other services.

It's no surprise that Colorado voters suspended their state's version of Measure 48 last year so they could fund public safety and other vital services.

Measure 48 will make it harder to protect our local communities. In every corner of Oregon, people count on local law enforcement. Measure 48 will force deep cuts in state and local government. That means longer response times, fewer officers on the road and insecurity in our communities.

Measure 48 puts bureaucratic roadblocks in the way of first responders. If disaster strikes Oregon, first responders have to move fast. But Measure 48 is so poorly written that the fine print says it would take a two-thirds vote of the state legislature and a vote of the people in November to approve necessary emergency funds.

Measure 48 is so poorly written that it could be retroactive. Read the fiscal impact statement for this measure – it could go into effect immediately, which means that the state will have to cut more than $2.5 billion out of the budget that has already been passed. Our safety programs cannot sustain those kinds of cuts and protect the public.

Look at the evidence and vote NO on Measure 48.

For more information on Measure 48
go to
www.DefendOregon.Org

Chris Brown
Douglas County Sheriff

Dennis Dotson
Lincoln County Sheriff

John Trumbo
Umatilla County Sheriff

Rick Eiesland
Wasco County Sheriff

(This information furnished by Becca Uherbelau, Defend Oregon Coalition.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 48 Would Mean
Fewer State Police On Duty

that's good news for
Meth traffickers
&
Drunk drivers

Oregon is in the middle of a methamphetamine epidemic that has cut a swath of misery through too many Oregon families and communities.

The Oregon State Police are on the front lines against the war on meth. Oregon's highways and interstates are the main source of trafficking from out-of-state and Mexican meth labs. Without troops on the road to intercept the carriers, Oregon's meth epidemic has a constant and uninterrupted source.

Because of severe budget cuts, the Oregon State Police has the fewest troopers per capita of any state.

We have the best chance in years to restore some of our lost funding when the state legislature reconvenes in January. We are ready to turn the corner.

Measure 48 would mean even fewer state troopers. This means less response when there is trouble on the road, less ability to catch drunk drivers, more criminals on the loose, and more meth in Oregon.

Measure 48 would mean that the gains the Oregon State Police are making would be immediately blocked. Measure 48 is so poorly written that it could go into effect immediately—cutting the already skeleton crew we have now.

Our budget is so tight there are times in the middle of the night where there are no troopers on the road and the meth traffickers know it.

The Oregon State Police Officers' Association
says vote NO on Measure 48.

For more information on the Measure 48 impact to
public safety in Oregon
go to

www.DefendOregon.Org

Jeff Leighty
President, Oregon State Police Officers' Association

(This information furnished by Jeff Leighty, President, Oregon State Police Officers' Association.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon's University Presidents ask
you to join them in voting NO on Measure 48

Measure 48 is nearly identical to a constitutional amendment that Colorado operated under for more than a decade. It forced deep and untargeted cuts to education, health care and public safety.

Colorado's version of Measure 48 resulted in its decline from 35th place to 48th place nationally in the funding it provided to its public colleges and universities.

If Measure 48 had been in effect in Oregon over this same period we would be operating today with 25% less funding for our students and for our extension services to farmers, ranchers and foresters.

-- That is $300 million less than we have today.

In Oregon, Measure 48 will have an immediate effect. More than $2 billion will be taken from the 2007-09 budget. Nearly $5 billion will be taken from the next biennium.

We've learned a lesson from Colorado: Vote NO on Measure 48.

Daniel O. Bernstine*
President, Portland State University

Edward J. Ray*
President, Oregon State University

Dave Frohnmayer*
President, University of Oregon

Martha Anne Dow*
President, Oregon Institute of Technology

Dr. Khosrow Fatemi*
President, Eastern Oregon University

John Minahan*
President, Western Oregon University

Elisabeth Zinser*
President, Southern Oregon University

*Titles used for identification purposes only and do not constitute an endorsement of or opposition to the measure by the Oregon State Board of Higher Education or Institutions of the Oregon University System

(This information furnished by Lisa Zavala.)


Argument in Opposition

Read the Fine Print

The Oregon Consumer League Urges a NO Vote on Measure 48

Measure 48 was paid for by a wealthy New York developer who does not have the best interests of Oregon at heart. Howard Rich, a powerful New York businessman has spent more than $7 million on ballot measures across the country. Rich has spent more than $1 million on ballot measures in Oregon and provided 85% of the funding to put Measure 48 on the ballot. (Source: The Oregonian. "New York money colors Oregon ballot." August 4, 2006)

Even the Measure Sponsors Admit it Will Not do What They are Promising. In a legal explanation to the state about Measure 48, here's what the measure sponsor said:

"Notice, in and of itself, the amendment does not create a rainy day fund. That is the province of the legislative assembly."

Measure 48 Chief Sponsor Don McIntire
Letter to the Secretary of State, Elections Division
August 9, 2004

This measure is so vague, confusing and poorly written that the official fiscal impact committee was unable to determine when it will go into effect. Measure 48 could be retroactive, which means it would cut $2.5 billion from the budget already passed and $4.9 from the 2007-2009 budget.

Read the fine print: Measure 48 will do nothing to solve the real problems with Oregon government. The biggest problem with Oregon's budget is the influence of special interests. We need ethics laws that will hold lobbyists and lawmakers accountable and keep influence peddling in check.

Measure 48 is not what it seems
Vote NO on Measure 48

Oregon Consumer League

(This information furnished by Jason Reynolds, Oregon Consumer League.)


Argument in Opposition

League of Women Voters of Oregon urges you to vote "No" on Measure 48.

Measure 48's proposed constitutional amendment would be a fiscal policy nightmare for Oregon. Unavoidable cost increases for healthcare, senior services and prisons would mean cuts to other programs like schools and public safety. This proposal ignores the fact that government spending does not keep pace with population and inflation during a recession; therefore, state spending would fall farther and farther behind with each economic cycle.

Measure 48 is poorly written. With no effective date for implementation, it could require retroactive cuts in the current General Fund budget. Because of this defect, the Voters' Pamphlet fiscal impact statement has two scenarios to indicate the decreased revenues for both 2005-07 and subsequent biennial budgets.

Oregonians should be concerned about these facts about Measure 48:

  1. It is an amendment to the Oregon Constitution, so its problems and unintended consequences would be difficult to change.
  2. It has no guidelines for accountability or spending priorities.
  3. 85% of the funding for the initiative came from just one person, New York developer Howard Rich, not from Oregonians.
  4. Coloradoans voted to suspend a similar spending cap last November. The cuts to state schools, healthcare and public safety were so devastating that the former governor, a previous supporter of the limits, led the campaign for its suspension.

The League of Women Voters of Oregon, a nonpartisan political organization that encourages informed participation in government, opposes Measure 48 because of its dire consequences for Oregon's future.

Please join the Oregon League of Women Voters in voting "No" on Measure 48.

Margaret Noel
President,
League of Women Voters of Oregon

(This information furnished by Margaret Noel, President, League of Women Voters of Oregon.)


Argument in Opposition

Governor Kulongoski Urges a No Vote on Measure 48

I ask all Oregonians to join me in rejecting Measure 48.

Now that our economy is improving, we are moving forward again – to make our schools better for our children, to make health care more affordable and accessible for our working families and to update the infrastructure that our businesses need to create and sustain good jobs.

We have worked hard to get our economy back on track and to repair the damage done to our schools, human services and public safety programs from the revenue losses we suffered during the last recession.

Measure 48 will derail these efforts. Just when our economy is recovering, Measure 48 will take us back to the days when schools had to close early, courts were cut back to four days a week, and we couldn't afford to maintain coverage for thousands of low-income working families in the Oregon Health Plan.

The citizens of Colorado learned a tough lesson under a measure very similar to this one – their roads deteriorated, high school graduation rates declined and fewer children received needed vaccinations. That's why the governor of Colorado led the successful effort to suspend this measure in that state.

We should learn from our experience in Oregon and from the experience of other states that have adopted arbitrary limits on public services.

We cannot afford to cut billions of dollars from a budget that is barely adequate to support our schools, senior services, health care and public safety. But that is exactly what Measure 48 will force us to do.

Please join me in voting No on Measure 48.

Ted Kulongoski
Governor

(This information furnished by Governor Ted Kulongoski.)


Argument in Opposition

Regarding the practical impacts of Ballot Measure 48, we can't speak for everyone and everything, but we'd like to talk about public safety.

"We" are AFSCME — the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. We have a vested interest in public safety, as we represent the corrections officers and other staff at most state prisons. And we can tell you things that the Department of Corrections, as a state agency, isn't allowed to do in a political campaign.

There's no argument that Measure 48 would reduce available revenue by $1.1 billion — it's (mostly out-of-state) supporters are hanging their hats on that number. The $1.1 billion "saved" by Measure 48 would all come from the General Fund, and in Oregon, most of the General Fund goes to K-12 education and public safety.

Unfortunately, our prison population is growing more rapidly than our general population rate. Consequently, we're building more state prisons. The newest one is the Deer Ridge prison in Madras, which will house 1,884 inmates.

So here's the question: Do we want the same debacle at the state level we've seen in Multnomah County with the Wapato Jail? Do we want to build Deer Ridge and then have it sit there empty, because there's no money to staff it? Give almost 2,000 potential state inmates a free pass? Because that's the kind of impact Measure 48 could have. Deer Ridge will be built, because construction comes primarily from state bonds. But running the prison once it's built is a General Fund function, and Measure 48 will pull that $1.1 billion right out of the General Fund.

Is this a scare tactic? Yes! Because it's a scary fact that people who should be in prison won't be in prison if Measure 48 passes. If you're not scared, you should be.

Measure 48 is a bad idea for lots of reasons. Its impact on public safety is one of them.

Vote NO! on Ballot Measure 48.

(This information furnished by Don Loving, Oregon AFSCME Council 75.)


Argument in Opposition

The Oregon Medical Association Urges You to
Vote NO on Measure 48

Measure 48 would impose a mandatory limit on state spending for critical services. The Oregon Medical Association asks you to vote NO because:

  1. M48 would force deep cuts to public services. The measure would remove $1.1 billion from the budget, and schools are already in serious trouble. Children, seniors and the poor would be particularly at risk because education, the Oregon Health Plan and other services would be on the budget chopping block.


  2. M48 formula is flawed. The formula assumes that increases in the state's population and inflation are the only reasons a state may need to increase spending. However, we know our population is aging and as such, will require more expensive health care. The TABOR formula ignores the real cost of sustaining state services.


  3. Learn from Colorado's mistakes. Colorado passed a similar measure, but it had such a dramatic and negative impact on education, health and road repair that they suspended the law.

Please Vote NO on Measure 48.

Andris Antoniskis, M.D.,
President, Oregon Medical Association

(This information furnished by Andris Antoniskis, M.D., President, Oregon Medical Association.)


Argument in Opposition

The Oregon Library Association urges a NO vote on Ballot Measure 48

The Oregon Library Association believes that every Oregonian – from children to senior citizens- should have access to a library.

Ballot Measure 48 would limit students' access to libraries.

Measure 48 will reduce available funds by up to $1.1 billion a year for education, health care and other important priorities. Oregon's school libraries have already been hurt by cuts to education funding. The number of school librarians has plummeted from over 800 in 1980 to less that 400 today. Measure 48 is a threat to Oregon's remaining school libraries.

Ballot Measure 48 has unintended consequences for local libraries.

Public libraries would feel the pinch as local governments struggle with dramatic cuts in state funding as a result of Measure 48. Faced with funding vital health care and public safety programs, local governments may be forced to reduce library budgets, closing branch libraries, reducing hours, and cutting programs that help children learn to read.

Ballot Measure 48 would cut community college and university libraries.

The flawed formula that Measure 48 would write into Oregon's Constitution has been and tried, and it failed. After 13 years under this formula, Colorado's education systems have been decimated with its university system dropping to 48th in funding. Measure would force deep cuts to our state's university system. This would mean that students would see cuts to campus libraries which are essential to a quality education.

Please join members of the Oregon Library Association
in voting No on Ballot Measure 48.

(This information furnished by Janet Webster, The Oregon Library Association.)


Argument in Opposition

The Chalkboard Project (www.chalkboardproject.org) is working to improve Oregon's K-12 public schools.

Chalkboard has developed a package of proven reforms to significantly raise student achievement. Our recommendations include specific changes to improve efficiency and save money, and key investments to improve student learning. Our proposals will ensure more high-quality teachers and administrators in every school, provide more learning support for young children, increase school system financial accountability, and strengthen school funding.

We are a non-profit, non-partisan organization, led by Oregon's largest charitable foundations. Our only agenda is to strengthen Oregon's public schools. It is highly unusual for Chalkboard to take a position on any ballot measure.

However, our independent view of Ballot Measure 48 is that it is an extraordinary proposal that will harm Oregon's public schools. If enacted, Measure 48 will require dramatic cuts to school budgets. In this diminished condition, our schools could not make the educational reforms necessary to improve student learning and success.

If Measure 48 passes, we won't be able to afford educational reforms such as providing strong mentors to all beginning teachers and administrators, or helping schools find ways to save money through better purchasing practices and performance audits. And extra support young children need, such as smaller class sizes and one-on-one reading tutoring, will be out of reach.

We count on our public schools to provide each child with a quality education and a chance at a successful future. Schools also must be accountable to taxpayers, and we know they're trying to do just that. Chalkboard is helping with that effort through our OpenBook$ project, which provides Oregonians with information about how school dollars are spent in each local district (www.openbooksproject.org).

We oppose Ballot Measure 48 because it would undermine our public schools' ability to do their job, and make it even more difficult to implement proven educational reforms that can dramatically improve our schools and better prepare our students for college, work and life.

(This information furnished by Charlie Walker, Chairman, Chalkboard Project Board of Directors.)


Argument in Opposition

We are Oregon businesses.
We believe in Oregon's future.
That's why we ask you to vote no on Measure 48.

Let's stop Measure 48 before it starts

Colorado businesses led the charge to suspend a Measure 48 style constitutional amendment in their state because it was undermining their economy. We cannot allow Oregon to make that same mistake.

Measure 48 is vague, complicated and could be retroactive. Measure 48 imposes at least $2.2 billion worth of cuts from the next state budget with no direction as to where those cuts will be made. And according to the fiscal impact statement, the cuts could be even deeper and more extreme if Measure 48 is retroactive.

Here's what happened in Colorado under that state's version of Measure 48:

Transportation:

Businesses need good roads and infrastructure to compete in today's global economy. But in Colorado, things got worse.

  • In Colorado, road conditions worsened. By 2001, 73% of Colorado's roads ranked as being in poor condition.
  • Colorado spends far less than other states to improve road conditions. It ranks 44th in the country.

Education:

Oregon companies need an educated, world-class workforce. But in Colorado education from kindergarten to the higher education system suffered under their version of Measure 48.

  • Spending on K-12 education dropped from 35th to 49th in the nation.
  • Average teacher salary compared to average pay in other occupations declined from 30th to 50th in the nation
  • Higher education funding dropped from 35th to 48th in the nation
  • Higher education funding per resident student dropped by 31 percent after adjusting for inflation

Cutting vital services is not the way to increase accountability.

We cannot allow Oregon to go backwards.

We ask you to join us in voting NO on Measure 48.

Deschutes Medical Products, Inc.
Bend

Blackledge Furniture
Corvallis

Intel Corporation
Hillsboro

Medford Fabrication
Medford

Hewlett-Packard Company
Corvallis

(This information furnished by Jill Eiland, Intel Corporation.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 48
will not increase government accountability or efficiency

It will mean deep, untargeted cuts that undermine Oregon's economy

The Beaverton and Hillsboro Chambers of Commerce expect accountability, efficiency and sound fiscal management at all levels of government and believe leadership and elected officials bear the responsibility for this management.

$2.2 billion worth of cuts in education, health care and public safety funding will not make Oregon's government more accountable.

Instead, it will hurt the things that Oregon's businesses count on – a strong public education system, adequate transportation systems, and a health care system that does not shift costs to employers.

Under Measure 48 in Colorado:

  • Colorado's job rate lagged behind the other mountain states;
  • Colorado's transportation system declined;
  • Colorado's K-12 funding dropped to among the lowest in the country; and
  • Colorado's tuition rates increased as state support dropped dramatically.

That's why in Colorado the Chambers of Commerce led the effort to suspend the state's version of Measure 48.

We have carefully reviewed Measure 48. There is nothing in the language that will add much-needed accountability to our state government. Instead, Measure 48 will push Oregon backwards.

The unintended consequences of
Measure 48 are serious.

Measure 48 is the wrong solution.

The Beaverton and Hillsboro Chambers of Commerce
Urge you to Vote NO on Measure 48

(This information furnished by Lorraine Clarno, President, Beaverton Area Chamber of Commerce; Deanna Palm, Hillsboro Chamber of Commerce.)


Argument in Opposition

A SPECIAL MESSAGE FROM PETE SORENSON

Dear Oregon Voter,

Hello, I'm Pete Sorenson, Lane County Commissioner, former Oregon State Senator and former Democratic candidate for Governor. I'm writing to urge you to vote against Measure 48, the proposed state spending limit.

I grew up in Coos County, Oregon, graduated from North Bend High School and Southwestern Oregon Community College, and earned three degrees at the University of Oregon. I worked in Congress and for the Carter Administration before practicing law in Eugene for 15 years. I served in the Oregon State Senate for four years and I've been a Lane County Commissioner for the past ten years. I also have two children attending college and both are graduates of South Eugene High School.

Measure 48 attacks Oregon's public schools, the Oregon State Police, the Oregon Health Plan and the senior and disabled among us. The state spending cap proposed by Measure 48 would drastically cut funding to these already under-funded and essential services by capping state spending based upon misleading estimates of population growth and rate of inflation. Measure 48 is such a disaster in the making, prominent leaders from both parties have spoken out against it. Voters passed a similar measure in Colorado only to repeal it ten years later after witnessing its devastating impact. Oregonians cannot afford to make this same mistake.

Measure 48 is supported by out-of-state money, funded by people who don't live here and who don't need these services, but Measure 48 is devastating for the people in our state who need or will need the services.

Make no mistake: there's a culture war here and Measure 48's backers see a goldmine, except they get the gold and we get the shaft.

Thanks,

Pete Sorenson
PO Box 10836
Eugene, Oregon 97440
www.petesorenson.com

PS. If you're opposing this measure, please email me at info@petesorenson.com or write me to let me know.
We've got to work together to defeat this measure!

(This information furnished by Pete Sorenson.)


Argument in Opposition

Mayors and city leaders from throughout Oregon, urban and rural, Democrat and Republican strongly oppose Measure 48.

Measure 48 is bad for cities. It will ultimately limit your city's ability to provide essential services.

Measure 48, another ill conceived initiative, will rip billions from the state's budget, crippling education, health care, corrections, and other essential state services. Furthermore, state shared revenues, essential to cities of all sizes will dry up.
These cuts to state programs and shared revenues will hinder each of our cities efforts at economic development, job creation, public safety services, etc.
This measure, in some cases, will force the state to turn away federal money.

Protect your city. Support our state.

Vote NO on Measure 48.

A list of Mayors opposed to Measure 48:

Mary Schamehorn, Mayor of Bandon
Rob Drake, Mayor of Beaverton
Pat Sherman, Mayor of Brookings
Tony A. Paulson, Mayor of Cave Junction
Cheryl Young, Mayor of Columbia City
Jim Fairchild, Mayor of Dallas
Jackie Brons, Mayor of Dayton
C. Diane Ragsdale, Mayor of Dundee
Irving E. Nuss Jr., Mayor of Enterprise
Robert J. Austin, Mayor of Estacada
Mike Weatherby, Mayor of Fairview
Charles J. Becker, Mayor of Gresham
Bob Severson, Mayor of Hermiston
John McArdle, Mayor of Independence
Dale De Long, Mayor of Island City
Michael D. Myers, Mayor of Jefferson
Lori Hollingsworth, Mayor of Lincoln City
Gary R. Zieg, Mayor of Malin
Dennis Ross, Mayor of Maupin
Thomas C. Bauman, Mayor of Mt. Angel
Shirley Kalkhoven, Mayor of Nehalem
Robert V. Stewart, Mayor of Newberg
Alice Norris, Mayor of Oregon City
Janet Taylor, Mayor of Salem
Craig E. Dirksen, Mayor of Tigard

(This information furnished by John McArdle, City Leaders of Oregon PAC.)


Argument in Opposition

THE OREGON ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® OPPOSES MEASURE 48

The Oregon Association of REALTORS®, asks you to please vote NO on Measure 48.

The Oregon Association of REALTORS® is the trade association for Oregon's REALTORS®, real estate professionals who help Oregonians achieve the American Dream of homeownership.

As REALTORS®, we have a strong and vested interest in Oregon's quality of life. Strong communities invest in an infrastructure, such as roads and schools, that support the needs of its citizens. Measure 48 would amend the Oregon Constitution by arbitrarily limiting state spending to a pre-set formula without regard to what citizens' needs would be in the future.

Top priority among our members is to help Oregonians achieve the dream of homeownership. State programs, such as the Oregon Bond program, have already been suspended in the event Measure 48 passes. This program has a long history of helping low and moderate income people buy their first home by providing them with low interest financing and cash assistance. Oregon REALTORS® support this program because it helps over 1,000 families a year achieve the American Dream. Measure 48 would jeopardize the future of this program.

Measure 48 will have negative impacts on Oregon's economy. A large portion of the state budget goes toward transportation infrastructure such as roads, bridges, waterways, railroads and airports. This infrastructure is essential to transporting goods and services, a necessary requirement for future business development in our State. Measure 48 will significantly reduce the funds that are used to maintain this infrastructure, putting our future at risk.

Finally, Measure 48 will cause drastic cuts to schools and higher education, undermining our public education system. Skilled workers and a strong educational system are essential to attracting business investment in Oregon. As Oregon's economy begins to rebound, don't risk our future with this approach.

Please vote NO on Measure 48.

(This information furnished by Jeremy Starr, President, Oregon Association of REALTORS.)


Argument in Opposition

The Real Estate Community says "No on 48"

The challenges faced by low- and moderate-income homebuyers in today's real estate market are significant.

Since 1977, homebuyers in Oregon have been able to turn to the Oregon Housing and Community Services Department Residential Home Loan Program (AKA the Oregon Bond loan) to make the dream of homeownership a reality. Through this program, in partnership with the State, participating lenders have been able to offer low- and moderate-income homebuyers an affordable fixed interest rate home loan. In the last 2 years alone, the Oregon Bond program has helped 2,500 individuals and families purchase their homes.

Taking not a penny from the State's General Fund—this program entirely self-funds. The interest paid by borrowers on the loans made covers all interest payments on the bonds issued to fund the program as well as the administrative costs for promoting and running the program plus paying for home buyer education.

The mere specter of the uncertainty generated by Measure 48 was enough for the State Treasurer to suspend issuing bonds for the Oregon Bond program, pending the outcome of this election. It will be a tragedy if this worthy program cannot be reinstated.

Whatever else Measure 48 may or may not do, it will certainly pull the rug out from under thousands of deserving low- and moderate-income Oregonians dreaming of owning a small piece of Oregon to call "home".

Homeownership is a good thing for Oregon—for our economy, for our communities, for our families.

The over 200 members of the Oregon real estate community—lenders, Realtors, homebuyers and their friends, families and advocates—wished to sign this statement but due to limitations of space their names cannot be shown.

Please join all of us and vote "No" on Measure 48.

(This information furnished by Julee Felsman.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon Food Bank Opposes Measure 48

Don't Let Oregon Slide Backwards

Measure 48 Hurts Families Struggling to Make Ends Meet by Cutting Vital Services

About 90% of Oregon's budget goes to fund schools, senior services, health care and public safety. Measure 48 will cut $1.1 billion a year from the state budget, which will mean cuts and reductions. The families who experience hunger and poverty are the same families that are in most need of the vital public services our state provides.

Cutting vital services will not force government to be more accountable. Instead, it punishes low-income Oregonians and seniors on a fixed income.

Measure 48 Hurts Our Most Vulnerable Citizens with Unintended Consequences

The unintended consequence of Measure 48 is that government will be forced to reduce services for our most vulnerable citizens: low-income families, children and senior citizens on fixed incomes.

But all segments of society will suffer – particularly our children as schools are forced to make devastating cuts.

Measure 48 Takes the State Backward

Last year, the Oregon Food Bank Statewide Network distributed more than 750,000 emergency food boxes through emergency food pantries. More than 50% of the households receiving emergency food boxes have at least one child in the household and more than 40% of these households have at least one working adult.

We are starting to turn the corner on the hunger crisis in Oregon, but Measure 48 is a huge step in the wrong direction. Oregon's economy is just now recovering from the recession. We are just starting to fund our vital services at adequate levels. Let's not go back to the days when Oregon led the nation in hunger.

Join Oregon Food Bank in Voting No on Measure 48

Because No One Should Be Hungry

Ronald W. Johnson, Chair
Oregon Food Bank Board of Directors

(This information furnished by Ron Johnson, Board Chair, Oregon Food Bank Board of Directors.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 48
Constitutional Amendment
Will Cost Us More in the End

Measure 48:

  • 85% funded by a special interest from outside of Oregon
  • Got to the ballot using fraud
  • A gift to special interests
  • Retroactive and complicated
  • Deep cuts to education, health care and public safety

Measure 48: Forced on Oregon by New York Developer Howard Rich
Howard Rich is a wealthy developer from New York who paid for 85% of the funding to amend Oregon's Constitution.

Measure 48: Out-of-state interest used fraud to put it on the ballot
Circulators are under investigation for violating Oregon's ban on payment-per-signature and misleading voters. If this measure lied and cheated its way onto the ballot, it can't be good for Oregon.

Measure 48: A gift to special interests
The biggest problem with Oregon's budget is the influence that powerful special interests have. We need tough new ethics laws that ban gifts and perks to weaken their influence.

Measure 48 is retroactive and complicated
This measure is so poorly written that it could be retroactive, meaning that it would force immediate cuts to Oregon's schools, public safety, health care and other public services. It will be up to the courts to decide.

Measure 48 hurts education, public safety and health care
Our kids deserve classrooms and teachers that will help them learn and prepare them for the future. Measure 48 means deep and arbitrary cuts to services with no guidelines or plans in place. Continuing to cut vital services will not force government to be more accountable.

Measure 48 will cost us more in the end
Measure 48 would have a boomerang effect—one way or another, working people will end up paying for cut services. Whether it's for more fees or for higher costs out-of pocket, we are going to pay.

Oregon's Union Movement urges you to vote NO on Measure 48

Tom Chamberlain
President
Oregon AFL-CIO

Barbara Byrd
Secretary-Treasurer
Oregon AFL-CIO

(This information furnished by Tom Chamberlain, President, Oregon AFL-CIO.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon Nurses Association
Urges a "NO" vote on Measure 48

We Can't Afford to Take a Step Backward When it Comes to Health Care

Over the last few years, Oregon has experienced deep cuts to its public health system. Thousands of Oregon families have lost health coverage.

Nurses on the front lines of our health care system have seen:

  • Illnesses like the flu going untreated and spreading unchecked
  • Patients unable to afford routine check-ups who end up in the emergency room
  • Cuts to nursing programs at our universities and community colleges
  • Cuts to School Based Health Centers that provide care to low-income children

Ballot Measure 48 Means Vital Health Programs and Services Will Be Cut Again

Oregon needs to focus our health care resources on prevention. The cuts to public health programs caused by TABOR will result in many Oregon families losing basic health services. In fact, under TABOR, Colorado lost the ability to adequately provide even the most basic prevention services like immunizations to children.

Ballot Measure 48 Guarantees We'll Pay More For Health Care in Hidden Costs

Private employers are already experiencing premium increases of 14% or more. As a matter of fact, about $1200 of every family's health insurance premium already goes to pay the costs of uninsured patients.

These increases will be even more dramatic as unreimbursed health care costs get passed along to businesses. As more small businesses can't provide health insurance, the number of employees without health care coverage will grow.

One way or another, we all end up paying for the cuts to health care.

Measure 48 builds in a blueprint for failure from the start.

As nurses, employers and as Oregonians, we care about our state and urge you to vote NO on this measure.

Susan King, RN, Executive Director, Oregon Nurses Association

Board of Directors

Virginia Pecora, RN Eugene
Susanna Rhodes, RN Aloha
Patricia DeShazer, RN Lakeview
Nancy McGrath, RN Medford

(This information furnished by Martin Taylor, Oregon Nurses Association.)


Argument in Opposition

As school board members from around the state, we serve communities large and small. Our kids go to school in urban and rural districts. They come from families from all walks of life.

But one thing that all Oregon kids have in common - They deserve a quality education with small class sizes and full school years.

Measure 48 will make it harder for kids to learn and succeed in school.

Measure 48 cuts $2.2 billion from the state budget, resulting in drastic cuts to schools all around Oregon. This Constitutional Amendment is so confusing that it may even be retroactive – schools and other important services may lose money they've already budgeted for.

Measure 48 is a Flawed Formula that would make Oregon's classrooms unrecognizable. It happened in Colorado, where under the same flawed formula, K-12 education funding dropped to 49th in the nation.

Under Measure 48's Flawed Formula, what would this mean for your local school?

  • Portland loses $51.9 million – equal to 645 teachers
  • Bend-La Pine loses $15.2 million – equal to 201 teachers
  • Corvallis loses $7.35 million – equal to 43 days or 107 to 140 teachers
  • Beaverton loses $38.02 million – equal to 36 days or 551 teachers
  • North Clackamas loses $17.6 million – equal 43 days or 239 teachers
  • Medford loses $13.737 million – equal 43 days or 174 teachers
  • Pendleton loses $3.53 million – 39 days or 59 teachers

Support Our Schools
Join us in Voting No on Measure 48

Bill Smith, School Board Member
Bend-LaPine Public Schools

Scott Reynolds, School Board Chair
Bend-LaPine Public Schools

Karen Cunningham, Member
Beaverton School Board

Elizabeth Scheeler, School Board Member
Pendleton Public Schools

Bobbie Regan, School Board Member
Portland Public Schools

David Wynde, School Board Member
Portland Public Schools

Craig Smith, School Board Member
Eugene Public Schools

Beth Gerot, School Board Member
Eugene Public Schools

Amy Amrhein, School Board Member
Ashland Public Schools

Heidi Parker, School Board Chair
Ashland Public Schools

(This information furnished by Morgan Allen, Defend Oregon Coalition.)


Argument in Opposition

As Oregonians, we have a deep respect for our State Constitution. I believe that we should give very careful consideration to any ballot measure that would amend or change this important document. I am urging my fellow Oregonians to vote "No" on this poorly written, ill-conceived Constitutional Amendment.

Measure 48 is yet another complicated, confusing Constitutional Amendment which will have grave results for every Oregonian. The citizens of Colorado lived under this measure for 13 years. They became so frustrated with the devastating impacts on their schools, their roads, their health care system and their ability to provide safe communities that they voted to suspend the so-called TABOR measure last November.

Measure 48 is part of a campaign by out-of-state special interests. Oregon is part of a multi-state ideological campaign to cut vital public services. These out-of state special interests seem to have no regard for the health and welfare of Oregonians.

Measure 48 would insert a flawed formula into Oregon's Constitution. It creates an artificial spending limit that is simply bad math and poor accounting. Measure 48 ignores the real costs of sustaining vital public services like public schools, health care programs for children and seniors, infrastructure like roads and bridges and public safety.

Measure 48 has serious, unintended consequences. This measure is so poorly written, that it could apply retroactively and force immediate cuts to programs that have already been budgeted for. Oregon's most vulnerable and at-risk citizens would be put in harm's way immediately.

Measure 48 moves Oregon in the wrong direction. Our state economy is recovering from one of Oregon's worst recessions. Measure 48 would take us back to a time when seniors were denied access to life-saving medication and school doors closed early.

Let's keep Oregon moving forward. I urge you to read your Voters' Pamphlet closely and consider the facts.

Please join me in voting "No" on Ballot Measure 48

Ron Wyden
United States Senator

(This information furnished by Becca Uherbelau, Communications Director, Defend Oregon Coalition.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon's Leading Senior Groups
Urge a "No" Vote on Ballot Measure 48

In Oregon, we care about seniors and our most vulnerable citizens. We know the importance of providing life-saving health care and quality in-home care to seniors and the disabled.

Ballot Measure 48 inserts a flawed formula into Oregon's Constitution

Measure 48's flawed formula poses a special threat to health and senior care. Health care costs are rising at a faster rate than Measure 48 accounts for. Over the next twenty years, the senior population will rise at three times the rate of the general population. Measure 48 prohibits the state from adjusting to these realities, leading to drastic cuts to health and senior care – just one of the many unintended consequences of Measure 48.

Measure 48 would leave Oregon seniors, disabled and low-income children behind

Measure 48 cuts at least $2.2 billion from next year's budget. This would force cuts in education, health care, and public safety.

What would it mean for Oregon's children and seniors?

  • Elimination of long-term care for 6,800 seniors and people with disabilities, including 1,200 people in nursing homes and 3,000 people receiving in-home care or;
  • Elimination of health care services for over 100,000 Oregonians - including 60,000 children or;
  • Elimination of paying Medicare premiums for over 19,000 seniors.

Ballot Measure 48 is a complicated, Constitutional amendment that failed in Colorado

Under the same flawed formula, Colorado experienced a devastating impact on education and health care services.

  • The percentage of low-income children without health insurance nearly doubled.
  • Colorado was 50th – dead last - in vaccinations for children.
  • Colorado's dropped to 48th in access to prenatal care.

Let's Learn from Colorado's Mistake.
Vote "No" on Measure 48

Oregon Alliance for Retired Americans
Save Oregon Seniors Coalition (SOS)
Advocacy Coalition of Seniors and People with Disabilities
Oregon Alliance of Senior and Health Services
Gray Panthers
United Seniors of Oregon
Oregon State Council for Retired Citizens

(This information furnished by Jim Davis, Oregon State Council For Retired Citizens.)


Argument in Opposition

Help Keep Higher Education Affordable for Oregonians
Vote No on Ballot Measure 48

Community colleges and our state universities have traditionally provided an affordable educational option for many working Oregonians.

But Ballot Measure 48's flawed formula would gut the community college and higher education system.

Ballot Measure 48 would force deep cuts in higher education in Oregon – just like it did in Colorado.

After 13 years under the same flawed formula, Colorado saw a steep decline in investments in higher education.

  • College and university funding declined from 35th to 48th in the nation
  • Higher education funding dropped by 31 percent
  • Community College tuitions increased by 21 percent

Oregon has already seen a dramatic disinvestment in higher education – with funds for higher education cut in half in the past decade. Oregonians have seen tuition skyrocket.

Measure 48 would make a bad situation worse.

And if the measure were to pass, there isn't anything our colleges and universities could do to make the situation better. Ballot Measure 48's flawed formula would punish all colleges if they chose to raise tuition to support programs. This means that colleges would be forced to make hurtful program cuts.

Eliminate programs. Deny students. Close campuses.

Ballot Measure 48 would make it impossible to reinvest in higher education.

Measure 48 would cut $1.1 billion a year from the state's budget which would devastate education, health care and public safety. The Constitutional amendment is so poorly written and confusing that it may even be retroactive – meaning that schools and other vital services may lose money they've already budgeted for.

The 11,000 education and health care professionals of the American Federation of Teachers-Oregon believe that every Oregonian should have access to quality educational opportunities at a price they can afford.

One thing is clear - Oregon can't afford Ballot Measure 48.
Please join us in Voting No on Ballot Measure 48

Mark Schwebke, President
American Federation of Teachers - Oregon

(This information furnished by Mark Schwebke, President, American Federation of Teachers - Oregon (AFT Oregon).)


Argument in Opposition

Keep Oregon Moving Forward
Vote "No" on Ballot Measure 48

Measure 48 would take Oregon in the wrong direction by cutting funding for Oregon's schools and other vital public services. Our communities are just beginning to recover and continued economic progress depends on stability in our schools.

Putting Measure 48 in Oregon's Constitution would create a permanent revenue shortfall for public schools. As Oregonians who are proudly educating our children in public schools across our state, we have seen the damage done by the recent cuts to education, and by the impact of uncertain funding. Our schools are just beginning to recover.

Measure 48 would cut more than $1.1 billion a year from the state budget. That would ensure that Oregon couldn't invest in education.

Everyone knows that if our kids don't get a high quality education, and our workforce isn't highly trained, our economy can't compete in the global markets. We need more investment in the future of our state not less -- unless we want our economy to move backward rather than forward.

Our kids don't deserve an education that ranks 49th in the nation. We saw it happen in Colorado. Under the same flawed formula as Measure 48, Colorado saw investments in education plummet – dropping funding levels for K-12 education to 49th in the nation. Our kids and our economy can't afford it.

Oregon's continued economic recovery depends on a stable education system and good schools. We have not yet recovered from the cuts to programs and services caused by the recent recession. Measure 48 would assure that our kids continue to struggle in overcrowded classrooms and suffer through shortened school years.

The 20,000 educational employees of the Oregon School Employees Association urge you to join us in our efforts to keep Oregon moving in the right direction.

Vote No on Ballot Measure 48

Merlene Martin, President, Oregon School Employees Association

(This information furnished by Merlene Martin, President, Oregon School Employees Association.)


Argument in Opposition

Keep Criminals in Jail
Vote "No" on Ballot Measure 48

Across Oregon, District Attorneys work hard to put violent offenders in jail. Oregonians want to be assured that once a criminal is convicted, they will serve their time and be off the streets.

Measure 48 threatens our ability to keep our neighborhoods safe.

This Constitutional Amendment creates huge holes in the state budget. Measure 48 will cut at least $2.2 billion from next year's budget cycle.

If Oregon had been operating under Measure 48's flawed formula since 1990, what would this mean for the safety of your community?

  • Identity theft and drug crimes wouldn't be prosecuted
  • In Multnomah County alone, we would lose more than 32 parole and probation officers – making it harder to supervise sex offenders and meth dealers and producing a 10% increase in felony crime - 700 more county residents would be victims of a crime

Measure 48 is a flawed formula that will increase crime and guarantee a revolving door for criminals.

One of the most frustrating parts of our job is when we see the same faces over and over again in our court rooms. Under Measure 48, convicted criminals would continue to cycle through the system and not have to pay for their crimes because we wouldn't have enough money to keep them in prison.

What would Measure 48 do to our state prisons?

  • It may force closure of eight institutions - impacting nearly 5,000 inmates; or,
  • Cut alcohol and drug treatment, job training, religious services, administration and other support services by 25%

Ballot Measure 48 has dangerous unintended consequences.
If prisons close and treatment programs are eliminated we'll see more crime in our communities.

Keep Oregon Safe
Vote "No" on Measure 48

Tim Colahan
Harney County District Attorney

Mark Huddleston
Jackson County District Attorney

Eric J. Nisley
Wasco County District Attorney

Doug Harcleroad
Lane County District Attorney

Michael Schrunk
Multnomah County District Attorney

(This information furnished by Becca Uherbelau, Communications Director, Defend Oregon Coalition.)


Argument in Opposition

Vote NO on Measure 48

Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon Opposes Measure 48

As a voice for many in the faith community and as a social service provider, we add our opposition to Measure 48. Without partnerships with the private sector and government, churches and faith-based charities would not have enough resources to serve all of society's most vulnerable populations. We all have a solemn responsibility to care for those who cannot do so for themselves.

Ballot Measure 48's formula is faulty. Population + general inflation aren't accurate predictors of social needs. The formula does not factor the actual inflation rates of many state services, like health care. The state would not be able to serve the record number of retiring baby boomers with specific health needs. Services like residential care, Oregon Project Independence, and the Oregon Health Plan would be cut in spite of the reality that the elderly population is growing faster than the general population.

What Happened In Colorado:

Colorado lived under the same measure for 13 years, and it forced deep cuts to public services. For example:

  • Colorado ranks last (50th) in the nation in the share of children receiving vaccinations
  • Colorado ranks 50th when it comes to low income children lacking health insurance
  • Colorado ranks 49th in K-12 education funding
  • Colorado ranks 48th in higher education funding

Even the best charitable efforts would not be enough if Measure 48 passes.

Signed by the Executive Committee of EMO
Rev. Alcena Boozer, St. Philip the Deacon Episcopal Church, Portland
Rev. Kent Harrop, First Baptist Church, McMinnville
Rev. Dr. Dan E. H. Bryant, (Disciples of Christ) First Christian Church, Eugene
Rev. Stephen Schafroth, St. Paul's Episcopal Church, The Dalles
Rev. Mark Knutson, Augustana Lutheran Church, Portland
Trudy Bradley, (Disciples of Christ) First Christian Church, Portland

Join with faith leaders in voting NO on Ballot Measure 48.

For more information on EMO's positions on ballot measures, go to www.emoregon.org.

(This information furnished by Reverend Alcena Boozer, Board President, Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon.)


Argument in Opposition

The Oregon Business Association and Oregon Businesses
OPPOSE
The Colorado Type of Spending Cap

Vote NO on Measure 48

Under the same flawed formula, Colorado saw a sharp decline in the services businesses
depend on:

Education
Transportation
Health care services

Oregon's businesses count on a well-education workforce, safe and expedient transportation systems, and a health care system that protects workers without unfairly shifting costs to employers.

The state of Colorado has firsthand experience with a Measure 48 type of constitutional amendment. Here is what happened:

K-12 Education Declined

Spending on K-12 education dropped from 35th to 49th in the nation and the average teacher salaries compared to the average pay in other occupations, declined from 30th to 50th in the nation.

Higher Education Declined:

Higher education funding dropped from 35th to 48th in the nation; and higher education funding per resident student dropped by 31%.

Transportation Infrastructure Declined:

By 2001, 73% of Colorado's roads ranked as being in poor condition and Colorado spends far less than other states to improve road conditions. It ranks 44th in the country.

Health Care Declined:

Colorado ranks dead last in childhood vaccination rates in the country and the number of uninsured children has increased dramatically.

Measure 48 is bad for businesses and for Oregon

Please join us in voting NO on Measure 48

James C. Carter, Nike Inc.
Executive Committee
Oregon Business Association

Wade Mosby, The Collins Companies
Executive Committee
Oregon Business Association

Lynn Lundquist
President
Oregon Business Association

Brian Gard, Gard & Gerber
Executive Committee
Oregon Business Association

(This information furnished by Lynn Lundquist, President, Oregon Business Association.)


Argument in Opposition

Hey, Howard Rich, what's your agenda for Oregon?

Measure 48 is based on the constitutional amendment that hurt the state of Colorado. There, voters learned the hard way that cutting vital services is not the way to make government more accountable. Coloradoans voted to repeal this arbitrary spending formula earlier this year.

Now, the same amendment has been exported to Oregon, thanks to one rich individual. Howard Rich has provided 85% of the funding for the Measure 48 campaign. He paid to put it on the ballot and now Oregon voters have to deal with it.

Measure 48 brought to Oregon by
Howard Rich, who is a
wealthy New York Developer:
Whose kids don't go to Oregon schools.
Whose parents don't count on Oregon's senior services.
Whose families do not need Oregon's public safety protection.

But our kids do go to Oregon's schools.
Our parents do count on Oregon's senior services.
Our families do need Oregon's public safety protections.

That's why we are voting NO on Measure 48

Measure 48 will cut $2.2 billion from the 2007-2009 budget. Health care, senior programs, public safety and education cannot sustain those kinds of cuts without reducing services. Gutting vital services is not the way to hold government more accountable

Measure 48 is the wrong solution. We are the front-line workers who help deliver the vital public services we all count on every day. The real problem in Oregon is the influence that rich lobbyists have. We need tough new ethics laws that ban gifts and perks to weaken their influence. That's reform that will work.

The 40,000 members of SEIU, Local 503
urge you to vote NO on Measure 48

Linda Burgin, Secretary-Treasurer
SEIU Local 503, OPEU

(This information furnished by Linda Burgin, Secretary-Treasurer, SEIU Local 503, OPEU.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon's Leading Health Care Advocates Say
NO on Measure 48

  • Measure 48 Has Unintended Consequences for Health Care in Oregon
    Measure 48's flawed formula is a threat to the health care of every Oregonian. Health care costs like prescription drugs and hospital visits are rising much faster than the measure will allow for. Factor in the needs of the baby boom generation and this flawed formula is a recipe for health care cuts.

    Measure 48 also forces Oregon to give up billions of dollars in Federal funds to pay for health care programs children, seniors and low-income families count on.
  • Measure 48 Will Force Cuts to Health Care—Just Like it did in Colorado
    For 13 years, the citizens of Colorado lived under Measure 48's flawed formula. The results were disastrous:

--Colorado dropped to 48th in the nation in the percentage of pregnant women receiving adequate prenatal care
--Colorado ranks 50th in the share of children receiving full immunizations
--Colorado ranks 50th in the number of low-income children lacking health insurance

  • Measure 48 will increase Health Care Costs
    When health care is unaffordable for Oregonians, serious disease often goes undetected until someone is rushed to the emergency room or becomes so sick they have to see a doctor. Oregonians end up paying for this care through increased premiums—$1258.00 is added to the average family health insurance premium to pay for uninsured care.
  • Measure 48 Will Hurt Rural Clinics and Hospitals
    Increases in the number of uninsured Oregonians put a real strain on our rural clinics and hospitals. We already have a nursing shortage in rural Oregon and Measure 48 will push many of these health care providers to the breaking point.

Vote NO on Measure 48

American Cancer Society
American Heart Association
American Lung Association of Oregon
National Association of Social Workers-Oregon
Oregon Developmental Disabilities Coalition
Oregon Rehabilitation Association
Oregonians For Health Security
Parkinson's Resources of Oregon

(This information furnished by Morgan Allen, Defend Oregon Coalition.)


Argument in Opposition

Vote No on Measure 48
Measure 48's Flawed Formula Will Hurt Oregon Children

Join Stand for Children in Voting No on Measure 48 to prevent harm to Oregon's schools and our school children.

In Colorado, the same flawed formula proposed in Measure 48 devastated public schools.

  • Colorado spending on K-12 dropped from 35th to 49th.
  • Damage to their schools is just one reason Colorado voters recently chose to suspend the measure in their state.

Measure 48's flawed formula would create a permanent revenue shortfall that would force schools to close their doors early, increase class size and lay off teachers. Measure 48 could cut $372 million from schools in 2007-09 alone.

The devastating long-term impact of this constitutional amendment only gets worse over time.

If Oregon had been operating under Ballot Measure 48's flawed formula since 1990, Oregon support for schools would have been reduced by more than $600 million per year in the 2005-07 biennium, equal to 40 days of school for a typical district.

In order to learn well, children must come to school well-nourished and healthy.

If Measure 48 passes, more Oregon children will go without health insurance – making it impossible for them to come to school ready to learn and forcing them to go to the Emergency Room for care.

Stand for Children believes strongly in accountability for spending of public school dollars.

But Measure 48 does nothing to hold government accountable.

The measure will create huge holes in the state's budget without directing the legislature to prioritize spending.

Our children, our economy, and our quality of life depend on strong public schools.

Please join Stand for Children in Voting No on Ballot Measure 48 to protect our schools and other programs that help children.

(This information furnished by Jonah Edelman, Executive Director, Stand For Children.)


Argument in Opposition

Vote NO on Measure 48
to
give everyone in Oregon a chance at a better future

Measure 48's flawed formula has been tried before and it didn't work. In Colorado, a similar constitutional amendment failed to deliver on its promises and instead meant deep cuts to higher education.

In Colorado, Measure 48 meant:

  • Skyrocketing tuition: Community College tuition increased 21%
  • Reduced funding for higher education: Higher Ed support dropped by 31% and declined from 35th to 48th in the nation

Less opportunity for Oregonians

Community colleges provide opportunity in all corners of Oregon for people to get the training and skills they need to succeed in today's information age. Our community colleges offer programs in everything from accounting to nursing to web site development. Without local, quality education programs, Oregon will go backward.

Measure 48 will cut $2.2 billion from the state budget in 2007-2009. Our community colleges cannot endure those kinds of revenue cuts without reducing or eliminating programs or increasing tuition.

The unintended consequences of Measure 48 are serious. For many Oregonians, their local community college is the only ticket to a better future. If programs are cut or tuition goes too high, they will have no where else to turn. We've built a community college system that provides a chance at a new start for more than 350,000 Oregonians every year. Measure 48 will move us backwards.

Protect Oregon's Community Colleges
Vote NO on Measure 48

For more information:
www.DefendOregon.org

Chuck Clemans, Board Member,
Clackamas Community College

Dean Wendle, Board Member
Rogue Community College

Rosemary Baker-Monaghan, Board Chair
Clatsop Community College

David Bridgham, Board Member
Southwestern Oregon Community College

Ernie Keller, Board Member, '05-'06 Board Chair
Columbia Gorge Community College

(This information furnished by Chuck Clemans, Board Member, Clackamas Community College.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 48
would put up a roadblock
on Oregon's transportation system
just like it did in Colorado.

Associated General Contractors Oregon-Columbia Chapter
and Oregon State Building and Construction Trades Council
say NO on Measure 48

Our contractors and their employees build and repair Oregon's roads and bridges. We keep the roads safe and efficient for everyone, whether it's a minivan full of kids on their way to a soccer game or semi-truck full of nursery stock headed to market in another state.

Measure 48 will permanently change transportation in Oregon for the worse. In Colorado, this constitutional amendment forced such deep cuts that the state could not afford to keep up with even basic repairs, let alone new construction.

  • After a decade of a Measure 48-style constitutional amendment, 73% of Colorado's roads were ranked as being in poor condition.
  • Colorado spends far less than other states to improve road conditions. It ranks 44th in the country.

Measure 48 is so flawed, the fine print would squelch the transportation projects the public is asking for. In 2003, the state legislature passed a $2.5 million transportation improvement package that was long overdo and much needed. In communities around the state construction on bridge repair and road upgrades has greatly improved transportation access and safety. But under Measure 48, the state legislature would not have been able to launch such a project, even though the funding did not come from tax dollars.

Measure 48 will make it impossible to do even basic bridge and road repair in Oregon.

We keep Oregon's roads and bridges safe
We ask you to vote NO on Measure 48

Bob Shiprack
Executive Secretary
Oregon State Building and Construction Trades Council

Jessica Adamson
Government Affairs Manager
Associated General Contractors Oregon - Columbia Chapter

(This information furnished by Bob Shiprack, Executive Secretary, Oregon State Building and Construction Trades Council.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 48 will
make our communities less safe

We are deeply concerned about the impact Measure 48 will have on our ability to adequately supervise parolees in Oregon.

Parole and probation officers are responsible for supervising released prisoners, including sex offenders. Corrections employees are on the front lines in Oregon's prison system. We know that Measure 48 will mean increased caseloads, less supervision for parolees and more felons on the street under early release programs.

Measure 48 is too extreme. Measure 48 will cut $2.2 billion from state spending with no guidelines on where those cuts should come from.

In Colorado, Measure 48 meant that parolees went unsupervised. Measure 48 in Colorado meant fewer probation officers on the job. In Colorado, officers have to supervise an average of 217 adult offenders, well above the national average of 130.

Oregon's prison population is scheduled to grow more than 20% over the next 10 years. That's nearly double the general population rate. Ballot Measure 48's flawed formula would force the State to release 1,200 inmates – or cut other programs like education more deeply – in order to free up the resources to keep those inmates incarcerated.

Measure 48 has unintended consequences. Because of Oregon's fast-growing prison population, Measure 48 sets up a scenario where prisons will be pitted against schools for funding and everyone will lose.

Keep prisoners in prison
Keep sex offenders supervised
Vote NO on Measure 48

Lisa Settell, President
Federation of Oregon Parole and Probation Officers

Bryan Goodman, President
Association of Oregon Correctional Employees

(This information furnished by Lisa Settell, President, Federation of Oregon Parole and Probation Officers; Bryan Goodman, President, Association of Oregon Corrections Employees.)


Argument in Opposition

Vote NO on Measure 48

The Human Services Coalition of Oregon
Opposes Measure 48

Measure 48 is a Complicated, Confusing, Constitutional Amendment

The Human Services Coalition of Oregon represents hundreds of social service providers, hospitals, health associations and individuals who work on the frontlines for Oregon's elderly, neediest and medically fragile residents. Many of our members do this work on a shoe string budget. They do it because they are committed to helping people in need.

Measure 48 undermines the state's partnership with private non-profits that make up the social safety net. Caring for the state's neediest residents is very expensive. There are not enough charities to take care for all of Oregon's neediest residents. Without a strong partnership with the state, our clients would be at risk to diminished care and our agencies at risk to closing down.

Measure 48 will force deep cuts to public services, just like it did in Colorado

Measure 48 would reduce budgets for vital public services by $1.1 billion a year. This would have a dramatic effect on funding health care for seniors. Oregonians can't afford to repeat the mistakes of Colorado.

Measure 48 is more complicated than it seems

Measure 48 uses the wrong formula to fund vital services. It uses a spending limit based on generic accounting—general population growth + general inflation. This ignores the faster rising costs of health care and the fastest growing segment of our population, retiring baby boomers.

Measure 48 has unintended consequences

The fiscal impact statement says that the measure could be interpreted to apply retroactively. Seniors and Oregon's most medically fragile residents can't afford that kind of uncertainty for programs that they depend on every day.

We all must depend on each other to care for Oregon.

Join HSCO in opposing Measure 48

Vote NO on 48

For More Information log onto: www.DefendOregon.org

(This information furnished by Phillip Kennedy-Wong, Co-Chair, Human Services Coalition of Oregon.)


Argument in Opposition

Get the facts:

Measure 48 sponsors say Measure 48 is
based on Colorado's flawed formula.

"We used the same standards as Colorado's spending limit – population and inflation."

Measure 48 sponsor, Don McIntire
The Oregonian
April 14, 2005

Measure 48 is funded 85% from
Howard Rich, a wealthy New York real estate magnate

"When you have almost all the money coming from out of state, it raises questions voters might want to think about, like, 'Is this really going to do what it says it's going to do?'"

John Matsusaka, president
Initiative & Referendum Institute
"New York cash colors Oregon ballot,"
The Oregonian, August 5th, 2006

Measure 48 is under investigation for
violating state election laws

"Misrepresentation of spending cap criticized"
KATU News
July 3, 2006

Our Oregon urges you to vote NO on Measure 48

www.OurOregon.org

(This information furnished by Christy B. Mason, Deputy Director, Our Oregon.)


Argument in Opposition

Measure 48 Puts Our Kids in Jeopardy – Just Ask Colorado!

Support Healthy Kids – Vote NO on 48

The Healthy Kids Learn Better Coalition is a partnership of organizations and individuals committed to eliminating physical, social and emotional barriers to learning.

Measure 48 will hurt the programs that keep our children healthy, safe and ready to learn.

Measure 48, the so called TABOR measure, failed the children of Colorado for 13 years. Children in Colorado suffered under this constitutional amendment:

  • Colorado fell to 49th in the nation in K-12 spending.
  • Colorado fell to 48th in the nation in access to pre-natal care.
  • Colorado fell to 50th (dead last) in the nation when it comes to immunizing their children.

Measure 48 will force deep cuts to vital services Oregon kids count on:

  • More than 14,000 children could lose health care services.
  • Prevention and intervention programs for children and youth will be in jeopardy.
  • School districts from Portland to Pendleton will have to cut teachers or eliminate school days.

Out-of-state special interests are hurting the health and well-being of Oregon kids:

  • Measure 48 is part of a campaign by national special interest groups.
  • Measure 48 has so many unintended consequences that the fiscal impact statement says it could be retroactive – health and safety programs we've already funded may be cut right away.

These members of the Healthy Kids Learn Better Coalition Urge a NO Vote on 48:

Children First for Oregon
CareOregon
Community Health Partnership
Oregon Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance
Upstream Public Health

For More Information Log On To: www.DefendOregon.org

(This information furnished by Tina Kotek, Children First for Oregon.)


Argument in Opposition

The Defend Oregon Coalition
OPPOSES Measure 48!

Here are just some of the groups who OPPOSE Measure 48:

AARP Oregon
Advocacy Coalition of Seniors and People with Disabilities
American Association of University Professors – PSU Chapter
American Cancer Society
American Federation of Teachers-Oregon
American Heart Association
American Lung Association of Oregon
Associated General Contractors Oregon-Columbia Chapter
Association of Oregon Corrections Employees
Association of Oregon Faculties
CareOregon
Children First for Oregon
Clackamas Community College Board
Clatsop Community College Board
Community Action Directors of Oregon
Confederation of Oregon School Administrators
Democratic Party of Oregon
Federation of Oregon Parole and Probation Officers
Gray Panthers
League of Women Voters of Oregon
National Association Of Social Workers - Oregon
Oregon AFL-CIO
Oregon Alliance For Retired Americans
Oregon Alliance of Senior and Health Services
Oregon Business Association
Oregon Center for Public Policy
Oregon Developmental Disabilities Coalition
Oregon Education Association
Oregon Head Start Association
Oregon League of Conservation Voters
Oregon PTA
Oregon Rehabilitation Association
Oregon School Employees Association
Oregon State Building Trades Council
Oregon State Council For Retired Citizens
Oregon State Fire Fighters Council
Oregon State Police Officers' Association
Oregonians For Health Security
Our Oregon
Parkinson's Resources of Oregon
Rural Organizing Project
Save Oregon Seniors Coalition (SOS)
SEIU Local 49
SEIU Local 503, OPEU
SEIU Oregon State Council
Stand For Children
United Food and Commercial Workers, Local 555
United Seniors of Oregon

For more information:
www.DefendOregon.org

(This information furnished by Becca Uherbelau, Communications Director, Defend Oregon Coalition.)


Argument in Opposition

Oregon's Business Leaders Oppose Measure 48

The Oregon Business Council is comprised of executives from some of Oregon's leading companies who work together in support of Oregon's economy and quality of life. The Council rarely takes positions on ballot measures. However, Measure 48 is an extreme proposal that would severely damage Oregon's economy and quality of life. Oregonians should reject this measure.

Measure 48 will force cuts in education, transportation and other vital public services

A strong economy depends on quality education, efficient transportation systems, and a healthy population. During the recent recession, Oregon cut back on public services as tax revenues plummeted. Measure 48 would lock in public expenditures at this low point and force even more service cuts in the future. As the economy rebounds, we have the opportunity to invest in schools, health care and public safety that will stimulate further economic growth and improve our quality of life. Measure 48 would put these plans on hold — damaging Oregon's ability to create jobs and strengthen our economy over the long haul.

Measure 48 unnecessarily pits programs against each other

In Oregon certain areas of the budget, such as transportation, are funded through separate resources, such as the gas tax. This means that advocates for transportation projects aren't asking for the same resources as advocates for public schools. Under Measure 48, however, these services would be pitted against one another since the spending limit applies to all state government spending. Imagine a situation where the legislature had to chose between funding schools and fixing our roads — even if there were adequate resources for both. It doesn't make any sense.

Join Oregon business leaders in rejecting this poorly crafted measure. Vote "NO" on Measure 48

www.orbusinesscouncil.org

(This information furnished by Duncan Wyse, Oregon Business Council.)

 

Elections Division, Oregon Secretary of State • 136 State Capitol • Salem, OR 97310-0722